first_imgDecision day has arrived for the 3,600 potential students admitted into the Notre Dame class of 2021. This year’s pool of 19,565 applicants — a new record for the University — allowed the admissions office to continue its trend of focusing on the whole applicant rather than one aspect of an application, such as test scores or grades, associate vice president of student enrollment Don Bishop said.“We understand in admissions that no matter how much you read the files and whether you use the numbers too much or not enough to inform you, there is a lot of serendipity,” Bishop said. “There are a lot of dynamics at college that you either respond to Notre Dame or you don’t in the way that we expected, and those attributes — there’s no SAT score for these sort of attributes. It’s not in the curriculum. It’s not your grades — there are just these intangibles.”Lauren Hebig | The Observer Director of admissions Bob Mundy said the department narrowed down the strong applicant pool — which included 7,500 applicants in the top one percent of the nation based on test scores and grades, of which only about one in three applicants was admitted — by searching for the right “match” with the University.“Some would call that reading for fit,” Mundy said. “Where, again, you’ve got these 7,500 really talented students, but sort of project forward — what’s [this student] going to look like when she’s a student here? … What kind of Notre Dame citizen is she going to be?”Several factors the department took into account in admitting students, Bishop said, were not quantifiable traits, such as leadership ability and desire to do good in the world.“Our attitude has been, ‘No, don’t overuse the numbers,’” he said. “So once you have a high enough number, we stop using the numbers [and] we look at the other attributes. So what other attributes? Well, there’s service to others, there’s leadership, there’s creativity [and] there’s kind of their motivation for their success.”This year’s pool of admitted students is also one of the most geographically diverse, Bishop said.“Our largest state of admits this year was California this time,” he said. “ … Apparently, we’re doing very well with international students and U.S. students studying abroad. So we are probably going to be at 7 to 8 percent international students this year, and probably closer to 10 percent of students that are outside of the U.S. … That’s going to be a historical high, and that’s something [that] is a goal of Notre Dame, is to keep becoming more global.”In addition to increased geographic diversity, Bishop said this year’s group of admitted students includes more women intending to major in fields of study that are typically male-dominated.“We also are seeing an increase in the number of women in engineering and the number of women in business,” he said. “That was a goal this year. It’s still under 40 percent in both, but compared to the national averages, we’re actually really moving up.”After informing potential students of their acceptance to the University online at 18:42 military time, Mundy said the admissions department took a more “personal” approach in connecting with admitted students through the acceptance packet this year.“We took a great line from one of their writings — like why they wanted to be at Notre Dame or something that happened to them in their life — and we captured it and put it on a refrigerator magnet with the Dome on the left side,” Mundy said. “And it’s just one of these real soft [things that we] put in an envelope, wrote them a note — we handwrite notes to probably 2,000 students — and we wrote saying, ‘Here’s something that really impressed us.’”In addition to this touch, Mundy said a revamped revisit format has attracted more families than ever before.“We also pretty dramatically changed our yield weekend events, or our yield events,” he said. “ … This year, we really have centered them around four events — four weekends … and then on Monday, we had a really well-defined academic day for the students, where each of the colleges sort of bought in.”Bishop said the increase in the number of families taking a second look at campus led to an increase in the number of early enrollments.“That’s been interesting to us, because right now we are a little ahead in our deposits from last year,” he said. “We still think in our model that we’re going to be right where we want to be, and we hope to take some students off wait list, but this increased number of visitors, I think, will be an ongoing trend.”Rather than hoping to fill the entire class of 2021 with initially accepted students, Bishop said the department aims to take 50 to 100 students off the wait list each year.“Wait list allows us to look at what part of the class didn’t fill in the way we expected,” he said. “ … So it allows us to kind of fill in an area, or — and this is also, I think, more true for the majority of the decisions — we look at how people respond to the adversity of being wait-listed, and we kind of reward the emotionally-skilled families [and] students where they showed character and they showed desire to be at Notre Dame.”Bishop said he hopes the finalized class of 2021 lives up to his expectations of being “forces for good” at the University and beyond.“We want you to be a force for good — not only being a high force, but a force for good,” Bishop said. “A lot of schools, their focus is on just getting you to be a high force for success, whether that’s as a scientist, a business person, a doctor, a politician, whatever. At Notre Dame, it’s for good.”Tags: Class of 2021, Notre Dame admissions, Office of Undergraduate Admissions, Prospective Studentslast_img read more

first_imgA small group of Syracuse players looked at one another, deciding who would be the spokesman for the latest historic event in a long line of them for the Syracuse men’s lacrosse program.The Orange had just captured the 800th victory in program history, a feat only duplicated by Johns Hopkins — a school that currently sits at 896 wins. Finally, the oldest at the podium took the microphone. SU’s crew of juniors at the table — Jovan Miller, Josh Amidon and Stephen Keogh — deferred to senior Max Bartig.‘Eight-hundred wins for any team is a huge feat,’ Bartig said. ‘That can go toward Coach Desko, toward the players, toward the coaches in the past. It’s just a number. Like Jovan (Miller) was saying, it’s all about the team for us.’Most of the players said they weren’t aware of the impending mark before the game. For SU head coach John Desko, though, it was a different story.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textDesko has been with the Orange as a player, assistant coach and head coach for more than 405 of the team’s 800 wins. And he took time after the game to revel in the accomplishment of his program.‘To be part of that tradition as an assistant coach and as a head coach, and to see it all, it’s important,’ Desko said. ‘ … To have this consistency and to be part of so many national championships and final fours and other championship games, I just feel I have a great appreciation of where it is and where it’s been. To be part of it is very important to me.’Faceoffs from the other sideSyracuse’s faceoff specialists haven’t been kind to their opponents so far this season. Jeremy Thompson and Gavin Jenkinson have each used different techniques to get the Orange possession and win the faceoff battle consistently. Thompson and Jenkinson have dominated in the X and have been most of the reason SU has gained possession on 59.1 percent of the draws so far this season. On Saturday, Albany’s Matt Mackenzie welcomed the challenge. He didn’t win the faceoff battle, but he had the most faceoff wins of any individual the Orange has faced so far this season. After the game, Mackenzie said the key to his success on the day started with his positive mindset going into each faceoff.‘I needed to go in there regardless of who I’m facing, whether it was Thompson or it was (Jenkinson),’ Mackenzie said. ‘You just need to go in there and have that mindset of, ‘You know what, I’m going to get this ball.’ I felt that I did a good job.’Before Saturday, the most faceoff wins an individual opponent had against came from Virginia’s Ryan Benincasa on March 7, when he had 10 wins on the draw in SU’s only loss of the season. And Mackenzie knew he would have to have similar success to give the Great Danes a chance. ‘Jeremy Thompson has like, five or six goals in under six seconds (this season),’ Mackenzie said. ‘I went into the game thinking I had to cut down on the fast break. I can’t let that happen, and I thought I did a pretty good job of tying them up.’Learning from last year  When Albany came to the Dome last season, Syracuse seemed to have a stranglehold on the game by halftime. The Orange took a 10-2 lead over the Great Danes into the break. But in the third, Albany came roaring back. The Great Danes outscored SU 8-1 in that quarter to pull within one goal.  Although the Orange did pull out the 15-13 win a year ago, head coach John Desko made sure his players did not forget about that game when they took a 9-3 lead into the break Saturday.  ‘In between the periods it was all about talking about what could happen and making sure that we valued our possessions and that we stayed out of the penalty box and didn’t make mental errors,’ Desko said.  Albany did score the first goal in the third quarter, but Bartig and senior attack Chris Daniello quickly abolished the Great Danes’ comeback hopes.  Just 12 seconds into a man-up opportunity, Daniello hit Bartig on the left side of the goal, and he fired a shot perfectly into the top corner of the cage. Two minutes later, Daniello breezed by Albany defenseman Brendan Gleason on a restart and scored from just outside the crease to extend the Orange lead to 11-4.  Albany head coach Scott Marr said his team had an opportunity to go on a run with the performance of faceoff man Matt Mackenzie. But unlike last year, it never materialized.  ‘We pieced a couple (goals) in there again, but they sprinkled some in so we never really could close the gap,’ Marr said. ‘In years past, we’ve gone on five-, six-, seven-goal runs, and unfortunately today, we didn’t have that same run.’ [email protected] [email protected] Published on April 5, 2010 at 12:00 pm Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Commentslast_img read more