first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A former Nassau County police officer has been sentenced to 15 years in prison for killing his wife in their upstate New York home last year, according to The Associated Press.Charles Wilkinson pleaded guilty in May to manslaughter in Saratoga County court. He was originally charged with second-degree murder.Prosecutors have said that the 69-year-old ex-cop killed his wife, Kathleen, “during a physical domestic dispute” in June 2014 and then “continued to live in the house over the weekend while his wife lay deceased in the bedroom.”Deputies from the Saratoga County Sheriff’s Office made the discovery at the couple’s Malta home when authorities were called to check the condition of the victim, who had not been heard from in several days.Investigators later determined that the woman had been fatally strangled.Prosecutors offered Wilkinson the plea deal because psychiatrists determined he was emotionally disturbed, AP reported.Wilkinson, who retired in 1984, collected a pension of more than $33,000 last year, records show.last_img read more

first_imgØrsted has signed contracts with 30 local suppliers for its Greater Changhua projects’ first 900MW and expects to award another ten more major contracts within the next two months for the construction phase, including onshore substation, foundations, turbines, and offshore cable installation.Matthias Bausenwein, Ørsted’s General Manager for Asia Pacific, said: “Since we established our office in Taiwan, during more than 800 days of hard work, we have signed 60 contracts with around 30 local suppliers. Greater Changhua projects’ first 900MW will support the development of a strong local supply chain. We will continue to share our expertise in offshore wind and to support local companies to evaluate their competence and capacity.”In the next two months, Ørsted will invite tenders for an EPC contract for the first onshore substation. The appointed EPC contractor will source mainly from local builders and suppliers to deliver the construction.Subject to obtaining all necessary permits and taking final investment decision, Ørsted will start onshore construction for the projects next year.The offshore wind giant has also urged international turbine suppliers to accelerate their localisation actions, since will be an important factor for Ørsted’s final turbine supplier selection.Namely, the company has called the turbine suppliers to provide clear action plans to further localise turbine sub-components (apart from turbine towers) while working with local suppliers through either local manufacturing or assembly facilities in Taiwan.last_img read more

first_imgTreñas also stressed the importance of proper coordination so that the city government could prepare for the returning OFWs such as their quarantine area and the provisions needed. According to the city mayor, what he was asking from the regional task force on the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was the strict adherence to safety protocols to ensure that SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes the disease, won’t spread in Iloilo and endanger the lives of residents. According to the Maritime Industry Authority (MARINA), one batch would have 232 OFWs (Aklan, 28; Antique, 29; Capiz, 25; and Iloilo, 150) while the other batch, 301 (Aklan, 53; Antique, 24; Capiz, 30; and Iloilo, 194). “We will clarify this. Indi nami nga ginaguba ang syudad. Lain diri ang nagakatabo, lain man sugid sa babaw,” said Treñas. Late Monday night in a televised address to the nation, Duterte said, local government units such as Iloilo City must not turn away returning overseas Filipino workers “o pipilitin kong sumunod kayo. I don’t want to embarrass people.” “Our position is clear. We want Ilonggo OFWs back and be with their families. However, because Iloilo province is under an enhanced community quarantine, we have protocols to follow,” said Defensor. ILOILO City – The President was likely fed with the wrong information, according to Mayor Jerry Treñas. He denied having prevented Manila-stranded overseas workers from returning to Iloilo. Treñas did not name anyone who could be giving President Rodrigo Duterte with false information but gave a hint, “Sila man to may access sa babaw.” “There was never an instance or occasion nga ginpa-untat ta ang pagbaton sang OFWs,” stressed Treñas yesterday. Two more batches of OFWs are set to return to Western Visayas. This should not happen again, said Treñas. He cited as example the return of some 40 OFWs from Cebu City in the second week of April and the over 200 others just this April 29 from Metro Manila. He lamented what happened to the OFWs who returned last week. Meals were delayed at a hotel here they were quarantined and there was no regular checking of their health condition, such as their temperature. (Fever is one of the symptoms of COVID-19.) For his part, Iloilo province’s Gov. Arthur Defensor Jr. defended his recent request to MARINA to defer the scheduled May 2 return of the 232 OFWs stranded in Manila. He said they must first undergo polymerase chain reaction (PCR) COVID-19 tests in Manila and that their results must be negative of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. He also pointed out that five of these OFWs tested positive for COVID-19 despite claims that their tests in Manila – prior to their departure to Iloilo – showed them without SARS-CoV-2. “I think may naga-intriga. Sa akon paglantaw lain ang information ang nagalab-ot sa babaw,” he said. The regional COVID-19 task force itself on May 4 sent Secretary Carlito Galvez Jr., chief implementer of the COVID-19 National Action Plan, a letter seeking the postponement of the return of stranded OFWs./PNlast_img read more

first_img… hopes COVID-19 doesn’t ruin 2020 Guyana Open CupBy Clifton RossREIGNING Guyana Open Golf champion Avinash Persaud said he’s training 4 times a week in hopes of competitive action returning soon, adding that the time-off was good way to mentally refresh yourself as a professional athlete.Guyana’s most successful golfer told this newspaper on Monday, that he has been maintaining his pedigree by hitting the greens during private practice sessions at the Lusignan Golf Club (LGC) Course a few times every week.Persaud, who has won the country’s top Golf title a record 10 times, with a number of those titles coming consecutively, believes that the little training-time afforded to golfers, who may be working or have other outside commitments; is needed in order to maintain one’s form as a pro-golfer.“I’ve been keeping and putting in as much practice as I can during the week. It’s good to keep training and go out there, get in some strokes just for a couple of hours a day; it’s good for me”, declared the champ.Although golf is playable during the pandemic due to the way golfers can reduce the number of holes as well as take to the greens without a caddy, the COVID-19 risk is still high. Persaud, not looking too much on his time away from golf, noted that he was using quarantine as a way to refresh the mind and body,“I always keep on training and practising because I’m hoping there is a tournament sometime time soon. But as a professional golfer, it is a very important time to take some time off and get your mind off golf and ease some stress,” said Persaud.A few weeks ago, the executives and members of the LGC gave back to their community of Lusignan on the East Coast of Demerara. The drive was part of many around the country and world, which was specifically geared towards helping those affected by the pandemic.Residents of Lusignan received a hamper among other means of relief, compliments of the LGC family, who said they felt the need to take care of the single-parent families and families of caddies who are out of work. The champ hailed the move as one which will only help to fight the pandemic going forward.Persaud also believed that should the current state of things remain a daily way of living for the next few months, the sport and its shareholders could suffer greatly.The champ who went to Jamaica and Suriname last year to represent Guyana at the respective invitational tournaments, believed that the ripple effect could trickle across the boardThe harsh reality is that should the course remain close for a few more months, the financial setback which mainly affects caddies and those employed in different positions at the Club, will inevitably end up hurting everyone affiliated with the sport – sponsors, players and grounds-men and others.“It was a good thing (the relief drive) because it helped the caddies and their families as well as those single parents who are facing a tough time during C0VID-19. We will have a good day when things get better but it can affect us because we need golf to keep the club and ground going; along with our sponsors for our weekly tournaments,” the champ pointed out.Wrapping up his interview, the defending champ was optimistic that the future will be kind to gold and that the LGC can host its annual Guyana Open Cup, which usually takes place between October and November.Persaud was further confident that his training and weekly practice sessions can see him get in some putting roughly 4 times a week, which will be enough to capture his 11th title, once the Guyana Cup is hosted.“Not playing competitive golf is tough but it’s not a worry for me (my playing form) because I’m always training and working on my game. But hopefully we can get in a few tournaments when things get safer, before the Open Cup,” Persaud concluded.last_img read more