first_imgStage and screen star James Rebhorn died March 21 at his home in South Orange, N.J. According to The New York Times the cause of death was melanoma. He was 65. His aunts Jean, Dorothy and Florence, numerous cousins and their families, and many devoted friends also survive Jim. He loved them all, and he knows they loved him. Rebhorn is survived by his wife, Rebecca Linn, and his daughters, Hannah and Emma. He penned an incredibly touching obituary for himself, which we’ve printed in full below. James Robert Rebhorn was born on Sept. 1, 1948, in Philadelphia, PA. His mother, Ardell Frances Rebhorn, nee Hoch, loved him very much and supported all his dreams. She taught him the value of good manners and courtesy, and that hospitality is no small thing. His father, James Harry Rebhorn, was no less devoted to him. From him, Jim learned that there is no excuse for poor craftsmanship. A job well done rarely takes more or less time than a job poorly done. They gave him his faith and wisely encouraged him to stay in touch with God. –Jim Rebhorn, March 2014 His children made him immensely proud. Their dedication to improving our species and making the world a better place gave him hope for the future. They deal with grief differently, and they should each manage it as they see fit. He hopes, however, that they will grieve his passing only as long as necessary. They have much good work to do, and they should get busy doing it. Time is flying by. His son-in-law, Ben, also survives him. Jim loved Ben, who was as a son to Jim, especially through these last months. He is also survived by his wife, Rebecca Fulton Linn, and his two daughters, Emma Rebecca Rebhorn and Hannah Linn Rebhorn. They anchored his life and gave him the freedom to live it. Without them, always at the center of his being, his life would have been little more than a vapor. Rebecca loved him with all his flaws, and in her the concept of ceaseless love could find no better example. His Life, According to Jim Homeland star Rebhorn was most recently seen on stage last year in Roundabout’s Too Much, Too Much, Too Many. His notable Broadway credits included Prelude to a Kiss, Twelve Angry Men, The Man Who Had All the Luck, I’m Not Rappaport, Our Town and Dinner at Eight. He appeared on the big screen in films including Scent of a Woman, Independence Day, Real Steel, The Game, Meet the Parents, My Cousin Vinny and Cold Mountain. Jim received his BA at Wittenberg University and his MFA at Columbia. He was a member of Lambda Chi Alpha Nu Zeta 624, a life-long Lutheran, and a longtime member of both the AMC and ACLU. Jim was fortunate enough to earn his living doing what he loved. He was a professional actor. His unions were always there for him, and he will remain forever grateful for the benefits he gained as a result of the union struggle. Without his exceptional teachers and the representation of the best agents in the business, he wouldn’t have had much of a career. He was a lucky man in every way. He is survived by his sister, Janice Barbara Galbraith, of Myrtle Beach, SC. She was his friend, his confidant, and, more often than either of them would like to admit, his bridge over troubled waters. View Commentslast_img read more

first_img Boomers discover mortality Dr. Bernard G. SuranAs the first wave of baby boomers sidles up to age 55, the scramble begins. Long-standing denial of creaking joints and expanding waistlines threatens to crumble if the reality of aging registers.Thus, alarms wail and drive the imagination to slow the ticking of the clock. After all, a generation that perfected jet travel, the Internet, and fast food should be able to toy with time any way they damn well please.The boomers say, “We’re not getting older. We’re not even losing any of our faculties while aging gracefully. And, we’re certainly not inching toward a nursing home with its image of white-garbed attendants wiping drool from our chins. It is not going to happen. No way.”Instead, a nervous boomer will invent some clever catchphrase that extends middle age into. . . well, maybe not infinity but certainly long enough to create mass denial and ease the jitters about creeping age. Maybe we’re not going to die. Like Burl Ives playing Big Daddy in “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof,” let’s all proclaim, “I think I’m going to live forever.” MiddlesenceOnce, before the time of hucksters, mankind followed a simple four-phase plan: youth, adulthood, old age, and dead as a doornail.Then, the social scientists rightly demonstrated the reality of other stages, phases, and passages; and we took comfort in knowing that growing pains were inherent in a life cycle ordained by nature.If we hung in long enough, we’d discover that we were built something like time-release capsules: As we reached specific ages, we’d experience thoughts and feelings suitable to the realities we had overcome and alerting us to the challenges ahead.True enough. The life cycle isn’t an invention; it’s a set of genuine realities we negotiate from birth to death — unless we try to fool Mother Nature.When we hit 55, the actuarial tables are predicting about a quarter century left to enjoy ourselves. At age 55, males have a life expectancy of 23.3 more years and females 27.4 years. Yes, we live longer. Yes, the miracles of modern medicine hold out hope for proving that the actuaries are giving us short shrift, etc. But, folks, some significant part of the end of our lives will be spent in old age. And rightly so, don’t you think?“Not so,” say the hucksters.Thus, the invention of a brand new stage of life staying the ravages of time: middlesence. Not senescence, middlesence — middling interminably through the final stages of life.Those who went before us used the final stages to prepare our wills and get our affairs in order. No need for that anymore. With the stroke of a keyboard, the middle part of our lives is being extended into a Great Age that, God and the hucksters willing, may not even terminate in “dead as a doornail.”Perhaps middlescence will be followed by post-middlescence or some other form of snake oil that softens the undeniable eventuality. The search for eternal youth has been replaced by the hope that middle age might last forever. And, for a hidden bonus, those adolescents who were slow to grow up will surely become middlescents, slow to grow old.The baby boomers are not happy with the prospect of growing older than they already are. The surveys show it, and the hucksters are making hay on it.And, how will the consumer strategists address the 76 million members of the coming “mature market?” Don’t call them golden-agers. Don’t call them seniors or gray hairs. Don’t indicate in any way that they’re growing older. Certainly, don’t lump them in with that group of golden oldies who have already seen 55 come and go. Instead, they are subliminally conned into believing that the Madison Avenue handstand of middlescence will halt all fears of the grim reaper.Erik Erickson, one of the psychologists responsible for developing stage theories of the life cycle, had no difficulty punctuating the later years with a specific stage. He called it ego-integrity vs. despair.When we have lived our lives fully, healthy persons accept the triumphs and failures of the life cycle as something that had to be, without alteration or substitution, the patrimony of one’s history, and the legacy for those who remain.The unwillingness to accept the whole of one’s life cycle expresses itself in the fear of death; despair triggers awareness that remaining years are short and activates a frantic search for alternate possibilities — like middlesence.In another quarter century, the oldest baby boomers will be nearing the end of middlesence (namely, death) while the youngest will be sharpening their denial skills.If we allow ourselves to be huckstered into a phony middlesence, we may never claim the right to grow old gracefully, to showcase the gift of aging for younger generations, to gather our wits and memories and weave the fabric of our histories into a statement of whom we have been and what our lives have stood for.Ashley Montagu once said he wanted to live fast and die young — as late as possible. Of course, he was just being clever. Just because we’re growing older doesn’t mean we can’t have some fun with it.We’d all like to hang on for a few more years, especially if we can manage our own drool. Some of us gray-haired, wrinkled oldsters are still buying green bananas and enjoying the audacity to work our appointment books by the month.While we’re middling toward the end of middlescence, however, we might lend due consideration to the meaning of our lives and how we will frame our convictions for posterity and the leap into the unknown.Soon enough, it’s old age and dead as a doornail. As nature intended. Some part of the final stage involves preparing ourselves for that reality so that those we leave behind may lead lives of conscious integrity without diving headlong into the denial pit.Our time will come. When it does, better to face it like a mensch rather than a con artist feigning surprise and disbelief — and oozing Eriksonian despair. Dr. Bernard G. Suran, Ph.D., is a licensed clinical psychologist and diplomat and fellow of the Academy of Clinical Psychology and the American Board of Professional Psychology. This column is published under the sponsorship of the Quality of Life and Career Committee. The committee’s Web site is at www.fla-lap.org/qlsm. The Quality of Life and Career Committee, in cooperation with the Florida State University College of Law, also has an interactive listserv titled “The Healthy Lawyer.” Details and subscription information regarding the listserv can be accessed through the committee’s Web site or by going directly to www.fla-lap.org/qlsm. November 1, 2002 Regular News Boomers discover mortalitylast_img read more

first_img– Lady Jags playing for pride“WE are Cubans, we will fight to the end and we will beat Guyana because we’re Cubans” Cuba’s Head Coach Lazra Ruiz Alfonso told reporters following his team’s scoreless draw against Barbados on Friday at the Leonora Track and Field Facility.The result meant that today’s clash between Cuba and Guyana in the final Group D match of the CONCACAF Women’s U-17 Caribbean Qualifiers will be more than intriguing considering the narrative.Barbados defeated Guyana 5 – 1 in their opening game and the draw against the Cubans meant that the ‘Bajans’ are on four points and holding a superior goal difference (+4) over the competition.For Cuba to advance to the final stage of the Caribbean Qualifiers in Haiti, they will have to defeat Guyana by more than five goals. Simply put, the Cubans will have to finish the match with a superior goal difference than Barbados to advance.“We have to be careful going into this final game because no game is equal to the other. I’m going to work on a structure going into the game because we didn’t score against Barbados and in football, especially a match like this, you win it with goals” Alphonso said.According to the Cuban Coach, “I normally speak with the players, let them be organised and just look forward to scoring and that’s what we’re going to do.”Meanwhile, Akilha Castello, head coach for the Lady Jags, believes that they’ve done their part and irrespective of today’s outcome, she’s happy with the progress made by the girls over the past couple of months.Guyana, by virtue of their defeat against Barbados, is out of the tournament, but Castello said the ladies will be playing for more than pride, since a win will boost their morale going ahead in the GFF’s Women’s programme.The 2018 CONCACAF Women’s U-17 Championship qualification is a women’s Under-17 football competition which decides the participating teams of the 2018 CONCACAF Women’s U-17 Championship. A total of eight teams will play in the final tournament.The 2018 CONCACAF Women’s U-17 Championship will be the 6th edition of the CONCACAF Women’s U-17 Championship, the biennial international youth football championship, organised by CONCACAF for the women’s Under-17 national teams of the North, Central American and Caribbean region.The top three teams of the tournament will qualify for the 2018 FIFA U-17 Women’s World Cup in Uruguay as the CONCACAF representatives.In the Caribbean Zone, 19 Caribbean Football Union (CFU) member national teams have entered the qualifying competition, consisting of two stages.Apart from Haiti, who received a bye as hosts of the final round, the remaining 18 teams entered the first round and were divided into three groups of four teams and two groups of three teams.The winners of each group advance to the final round to join Haiti, where they will be divided into two groups of three teams, with the top three teams qualifying for the final tournament as the CFU representatives.Trinidad and Tobago, Puerto Rico, Saint Lucia, Guyana, and St Vincent and the Grenadines were automatically seeded in Groups A–E respectively as hosts of each first round group, while the remaining 14 teams were seeded based on the results of the previous two editions of the qualifying competition.last_img read more