first_imgTwo-time Unified heavy weight champion, Anthony Joshua has questioned the credentials of Tyson Fury and says he hasn’t fought enough difficult matches to be called intimidating.Joshua and Fury are likely to face off next year in two blockbuster heavyweight showdowns after both sides agreed on the finances last month.He will next defend his IBF, WBA and WBO belts against Kubrat Pulev, while WBC champion Fury will fight Wilder again.But Joshua says Fury hasn’t been in the deep end long enough to be considered one of the generation’s best.“So what do people see in Fury that is so fearsome, intimidating, that he can’t be touched at the top level?“I take him as a serious challenger, of course. But resume? It’s taken him a long time to grow.“His fight with Wladimir Klitschko was his first real challenge and he overcame it, but it took him eight years to build his experience and confidence, he said in an interview with Sky sports.“Then he had two years out and fought Deontay Wilder.“He hasn’t been in the deep end for long enough to show me that he can swim there for a long time. You have to continually prove that you belong there. You don’t just come there once or twice.“For me as a fighter, that’s how you gain my respect.”last_img read more

first_img U.S. Open 2019: Aaron Wise learns from Brooks Koepka’s ‘calmness’ U.S. Open 2019: Justin Rose closes round with 3 straight birdies to take solo lead Tiger Woods said he was “very pleased” to start his U.S. Open campaign under par at a tricky Pebble Beach.Former world No. 1 Woods carded a 1-under 70 to end Thursday’s opening round five shots off the pace. The fist pump …Some pars are better than others. pic.twitter.com/RNjwCrCZjZ— PGA TOUR (@PGATOUR) June 14, 2019″It’s typical Pebble Beach where the first seven holes you can get it going, and then after that you’re kind of fighting and kind of hanging on,” Woods told reporters.”I kind of proved that today. I had it going early and had to fight off through the middle part of the round and hung in there with pars. Very pleased to shoot under par today.”Woods said: “As I said, the first seven holes you can get it going, and you can be 4 to 5 under through the first seven holes. And then after that some of those were on the tricky side. They were hard to get it back and close to. Woods — a three-time U.S. Open champion with his last triumph coming in 2008 — battled his way around the course in California, where he had three birdies and a double bogey on the front nine.Despite not playing at his best, 15-time major winner Woods managed to stay within sight of leader Justin Rose. Related News U.S. Open 2019: Tiger Woods scratches, claws way to 1-under 70 “Rosey kind of proved that today, kind of hang in there and fight it off. He had an amazing finish. I was in position to do the same thing, kind of hanging in there and was able to post an under par today.””It seemed like the majority of the guys were under par through the first seven holes, and then nobody was making hay after that,” Woods added. “And it was a little bit tricky.”Three birdies in his last four [email protected] surges into red numbers. pic.twitter.com/kXC3brtD9r— PGA TOUR (@PGATOUR) June 13, 2019Masters champion Woods will tee off on Friday in a tie for 28th alongside Jason Day, Adam Scott, Carlos Ortiz, Jason Dufner, Zach Johnson, Tyrrell Hatton, Matt Wallace, Rafa Cabrera Bello, Paul Casey, Jovan Rebula and An Byeong-hun.last_img read more

first_imgMadeline Holitzki edged into the top ten in 50 meter butterfly (10th) and ninth in 50 meter breaststroke.The up-and-coming swimmer also finished 20th in 50 meter backstroke,  to go with a 17th 100 meter individual medley.Samuel Matthew placed 13th 200 meter IM, 18th in 50 meter butterfly, 15th in 100 meter backstroke, 11th in 100 meter breaststrokeMatthew Holitzki checked in with a 21st in 100 meter IM, 20th in 50 meter butterfly, 23rd in 50 meter backstroke and 17th in 50 meter breaststroke.”I have seen so much improvement in all of the swimmers regardless if it was their first year or they have been swimming over five years,” Afford said.”They have been diligent to change their technique — the basis of their propulsion in the water and continuation in the sport to avoid injury. “It was so great to see the older swimmers inspire the younger ones and begin to take a leadership role in the team,” she added. ” It was so great to have the seniors volunteer coach and promoting team spirit.”As the season concluded in Nanaimo, the Neptunes handed out the team awards.Female Aggregate: Sage Cowan                        Male Aggregate: Samuel MatthewMost Improved Female Swimmer: Jaylen RushtonMost Improved Male Swimmer: Lachlan Bibby-FoxBest New Female: Ohia WintraubBest New Male: Logan WrightMost Sportsmanlike Female Div. 1-3: Devan AndrusakMost Sportsmanlike Male Div. 1-3: Matthew HolitzkiMost Sportsmanlike Female Div. 4-8: Nava SachsJunior Spirit Award: Madeline HolitzkiSenior Spirit Award: Sage CowanExcellence in Mental Strength Female Div. 1-3: Sabien EdneyExcellence in Mental Strength Male Div. 1-3 : Rohan MoolaExcellence in Mental Strength Female Div. 4-8: Katie DeJongCoaches Award Female Div. 1-3: Olivia CowanCoaches Award Male Div. 1-3: Cameron Bibby-FoxCoaches Award Female Div. 4-8: Joanna BlishenCoaches Award Male Div. 4-8: Samuel MatthewLeadership: Emma Borhi and Hannah Sachs A handful of Nelson Neptune swimmers took to the road to see how they stack up against the best in the province at the B.C. Summer Swim Association Championships held recently in Nanaimo.Madeline Holitzki, Samuel Matthew, Matthew Holitzski and Jaylen Rushton were the only Neptunes to attend the provincial meet but still registered very impressive results.”I am happy with the results as it was most of the swimmers’ first provincial meet,” said Neptune skipper Rebecca Affortd.”Almost every race, especially in preliminaries, was a best time with most of them taking off about two or three seconds.Rushton recored the best finish of a Neptune, placing seventh in 50 meter butterfly.Rushton also had a two top-20 results — 11th 50 meter breaststroke and 15th in 100 meter freestyle.last_img read more

first_imgThe very mention of a crunch April game against Notts County is enough to send shivers up the spine of Brentford supporters of a certain age.Because, on the eve of another Magpies visit which could help decide where the Bees will play next season, if you were there it is impossible not to cast your mind back 19 years and wonder ‘what if’.To put what happened into context let me explain the background to the match.Brentford were playing in the second tier for the first time since 1954, which was a unique experience for a fair percentage of their supporters.Halfway through the season, ironically after a Christmas holiday 1-1 draw away to County, the Bees sat comfortably in 10th place in the table with no evident relegation worries.Although they had lost captain and inspirational centre-half Terry Evans on the first day of the season, Brentford had more than held their own – with a home draw at West Ham and win at Sunderland among their more impressive results.However, the new year brought a bad run from which they could not escape.Slowly they started to slip down the table with injuries playing a part and forcing them to play two wingers as full-backs.That was the case during an embarrassing 6-1 thrashing at Millwall, which was made worse by the fact it was televised live on ITV.After a run of one win in 13 games they were in the relegation zone for the first time.A brief revival of two wins and two draws gave the fans hope and lifted Brentford back up to 17th with six games remaining.On Easter Saturday the Bees went down 3-2 to a Derby side, who earlier in the season had deprived them of a place at Wembley in the Anglo-Italian Cup final.So the visit of Notts County two days later, on 12 April, was crucial to Brentford’s survival hopes.The Bees had not won a home game since Boxing Day and when County took a fifth-minute lead it appeared to be the same old story.But Alan Dickens quickly equalised and then in the 65th minute Gary Blissett gave the hosts a priceless lead.The rest of the game seemed to drag and when it moved into injury-time fans’ nerves were shredded.It was then that referee Mr Biggar indelibly etched himself into Brentford history. In those days there was no board signalling how much extra time the officials would play – the crowd just had to wait for the referee to blow the final whistle.There had been hardly any stoppages in the second half but still the game kept going and going until in the sixth extra minute County inevitably equalised.No-one knew where the time had come from and the game kept going for another couple of minutes – but when the match did finally end the players and fans were simply devastated.The Bees never recovered and although they finally recorded a home win in their final game at Griffin Park by beating Barnsley 3-1, they went down meekly after a final day 4-1 hammering at Bristol City.But it was the day the Magpies flew away from Griffin Park with their extra point which is even now talked about as the one when Brentford’s relegation fate was sealed.Follow me on Twitter at @ianwestbrooklast_img read more

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos on a mobile deviceSAN FRANCISCO — The Giants fielded calls and explored various trade scenarios involving Madison Bumgarner around the trade deadline, but an extended July hot streak and a desire to contend convinced the front office to hold onto the team’s ace.With one month left in the regular season, Bumgarner’s future with the Giants will once again become a frequent topic of discussion.The 30-year-old left-handed starter is set …last_img read more

first_imgSome of the biggest questions in the universe remain completely baffling to astronomers, a leading journal admitted.Science Magazine (1 June 2012: Vol. 336 no. 6085 p. 1090, DOI: 10.1126/science.336.6085.1090-a) included a special feature this week: “Mysteries of Astronomy.”  Robert Coontz introduced the feature:Endless mysteries lurk in the depths of space. To pare the list down to eight—now, there’s a challenge….  From the outset, the team decided that true mysteries must have staying power (as opposed to mere “questions” that researchers might resolve in the near future). Some of the finalists are obvious shoo-ins; others have received less of the popular limelight. The final selection spans the entire history of the universe on scales ranging from our sun and its planetary system to the entire cosmos. Each mystery is sure to be solved largely through astronomical observations—if it is solved: In at least one case, experts aren’t sure that a seemingly simple question will ever be answered.The top eight mysteries selected by Science are:What is dark energy?  Adrian Cho began, “The nature of the “dark energy” that is causing the expansion of the universe to accelerate is now perhaps the most profound mystery in cosmology and astrophysics. And it may remain forever so.”  (This is the “seemingly simple question” Coontz worried would never be answered.)How hot is dark matter?  Adrian Cho described the decades-old controversy about whether dark matter is hot (ordinary matter) or cold (unknown stuff).  They still don’t know what it is, but Cho believes “that could soon change.”Where are the missing baryons?  For laymen, baryons are atoms and ions, or “ordinary matter.”  But where the missing baryons are is no ordinary matter; astronomers can only account for less than half of what they expected to find.How do stars explode?  Supernova explosions have been animated by artists for years.  That doesn’t mean they are understood.  Yudhijit Bhattacharjee lamented, “Many details of what goes on inside a star when its fuel has been spent and it explodes into a giant fireball known as a supernova, as well as how that explosion unfolds, remain a mystery.”What re-ionized the universe?  According to consensus theory, a few hundred million years after the Big Bang, the universe became transparent when matter re-ionized.  TV programs explain this as just a matter of fact, but as for what caused it, Edwin Cartlidge admitted, “No one is sure.”What’s the source of the most energetic cosmic rays?  Daniel Clery wrote, “After a century of cosmic-ray research, the most energetic visitors from space remain stubbornly enigmatic and look set on keeping their secrets for years to come.”Why is the solar system so bizarre?  Richard A. Kerr described how each planet, when visited by spacecraft, turned out to be more puzzling than expected.  “As exoplanet hunters get beyond stamp-collecting planets solely by orbit and mass, they will have a far larger number of planetary outcomes to consider, beyond what our local neighborhood can offer,” he concluded his tour.  “Perhaps patterns will emerge from inchoate diversity.”Why is the sun’s corona so hot?  Every once in awhile, a new theory claims this mystery has been explained.  Apparently not; Richard A. Kerr surveyed leading theories, but it still made Science‘s Top 8 Mystery List.See Space.com article for layman’s summary of these mysteries, and another Space.com entry in countdown format.Entry #7, “Why is the solar system so bizarre?” deserves a closer look.  Kerr said that Pluto has been partially explained as a member of a previously undiscovered population of trans-Neptunian objects.  “The mysteries of the remaining eight planets,” i.e., all of them – Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune – “are proving more recalcitrant,” he said.  Before space probes, planetary scientists expected to find patterns that would support a general theory of planetary origins.  That hope has evaporated:Looming over all the attempts to explain planetary diversity, however, is the chilling specter of random chance. Computer simulations show that the chaos of caroming planetesimals in our still-forming planetary system could just as easily have led to three or five terrestrial planets instead of four. Mercury may have largely formed with a thick rocky shell only to have it blown away by a chance collision with a still-forming planet nearly its own size. A rare big hit to Uranus might have not only knocked it on its side, where it spins to this day, but also shaken up its rocky core. If so, the more organized churnings of a shallow fluid shell could be generating its magnetic field, producing the observed tilt.Ferreting out rare random events in the early days of the nascent solar system could be problematic, scientists concede. They may have to settle for working out many of the rules of the planet-making game without pinning down exactly how a particular planetary quirk came to be.Thus the “inchoate diversity” of which he spoke (inchoate meaning unorganized, disordered).  Kerr left it to future astronomers to find a way out of that chilling specter of random chance.  “As exoplanet hunters get beyond stamp-collecting planets solely by orbit and mass, they will have a far larger number of planetary outcomes to consider, beyond what our local neighborhood can offer,” Kerr ended as optimistically as possible.  “Perhaps patterns will emerge from inchoate diversity.”What?  Science doesn’t have the answers?  These are BIG mysteries.  Some of them are the very questions for which TV animators for the Science Channel, NOVA and National Geographic offer solutions that are neat, simple, and wrong.  We deceive students by teaching simplistic, wrong answers without revealing that scientists have only partial answers, if any.  What distinguishes science, whose root means “knowledge,” from other methods of human inquiry that also have more questions than answers?Batters get three strikes and are out.  Planetary scientists are zero for 8 as far as observations meeting predictions (even worse when moons like Io, Enceladus and Titan are included).  Astronomers and cosmologists are not batting any better.  In any other human endeavor, a zero score would be called utter incompetence.  Astronomers and planetologists are very good at describing  what is (i.e., stamp collecting), but NOT how it came to be.  Those two skills are completely different.  They can remain on as stamp collectors, but not as prophets.Notice that planetary science is stuck with the Stuff Happens Law (the opposite of scientific explanation).   That’s what Kerr meant by the “chilling specter of random chance.”  If materialists are stuck with throwing up their hands and saying, “stuff happens” when asked why human beings won the cosmic lottery, they need to step off the pedestal of Knowledge and yield the platform to those who can state a positive case for design (reference: The Privileged Planet documentary).   It’s the planetary scientists – not the planets – that are being recalcitrant.(Visited 14 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

first_imgNo need to feel insignificant in a lonely universe. You are loaded with great equipment for an exciting life.Grab a cup of coffee: How common, how simple; gripping a cup or other object. Do you realize what that involves? Ask any robot designer who tries to program a machine to do it. Researchers at Brown University studied how the brain plans for gripping an object. It kept them pretty busy. They found that “the brain can formulate different grips on the same object or the same grip on different objects.”Eye coordination: You’re not a cyclops. You have two eyes, but how does the brain put the two inputs together, so that you see a single unified image? Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison looked into that, and found that three visual centers in the brain work to unify the visual field. See details in the UWM press release.Stable view: “Without us being aware of it, our eyes constantly perform tiny corrections of their viewing direction,” a press release from the University of Tubingen begins. Seeking to understand these movements, called saccades (and tinier movements called microsaccades), “They have discovered a direct link between tiny eye movements and the focusing of attention needed to perceive our visual environment.” There’s a purpose in these seemingly-negligible microsaccades that go on unconsciously and automatically. “This mechanism allows our brain to ‘keep an eye out’ even when our eyes are busy, keeping tabs on the environment, warning of danger, and thus allowing our active perception to rapidly re-focus on anything that might happen.”Twitter for cells: Like the chatter on the internet, your body’s cells talk to one another in a multitude of ways. That’s the subject of an interesting article on Medical Xpress that shows how intercellular communication provides division of labor,  signaling, and functional coordination.Brain’s got rhythm: Consider your brain’s challenge. “The human brain has 86 billion or so neurons all trying to talk to each other in this incredibly messy, noisy and electrochemical soup,” a lead researcher from Berkeley says in Science Daily. The brain’s rhythmic waves and periodic synchronizations, like downbeats, help “brain networks quickly come together and break apart as needed.” The Duke Ellington reference in the title is clever: “It don’t mean a thing if the brain ain’t got that swing.”4-D Organization: Speaking of rhythm, we all keep sync with rhythmic cycles of day and night, seasons and years. Researchers publishing in PNAS tried to decipher the “4-D nucleome,” how our genetic code acts in time. Looking at the human genome as a dynamical system, they “interrogated the dynamical relationship between genome architecture (structure) and gene expression (function) and its impact on phenotype,” and found some interesting patterns:Using genome-wide intragene and intergene contact maps, we identified gene networks with high potential for coregulation and colocalization, consistent with expression via transcription factories. In an intriguing example, we found periodic movements of circadian genes in three dimensions that entrained with expression.Bone repair: Aren’t you glad bones can heal? This doesn’t just happen. It took planning and design for there to be bone progenitor cells ready to fix things, and protocols to get them working. A paper in PNAS shows that there are layers of readiness in the system. “Our results indicate that the skeletal progenitor population is functionally stratified, containing distinct subsets responsible for growth, regeneration, and repair. Furthermore, our findings suggest that injury-induced changes to the skeletal stem and progenitor microenvironments could activate these cells and enhance their regenerative potential.”More than a sperm donor: Sexual reproduction is a couples thing. Both sexes contribute to one another and the next generation in unique, crucial ways. One might think a male just contributes his sperm and is done with it, but there’s more to semen than sperm. New Scientist reports that “Semen has controlling power over female genes and behaviour.”Tongue update: Time to rewrite the textbooks on taste. “That neat and tidy map of tastes on the tongue you learned in school is all wrong,” Medical Xpress says. But is anything in biology simple when you look at it in detail? “Indeed, results from a number of experiments indicate that all areas of the mouth containing taste buds – including several parts of the tongue, the soft palate (on the roof of your mouth) and the throat – are sensitive to all taste qualities.”Readers of the Pentateuch can’t fail to be impressed with God’s anger at grumblers. These news items show why. It’s a crime to be thankless for the gifts we have been given. Look at any one of these magnificent wonders in the human body; how could anyone fail to be astonished at the level of creative genius behind them? He made it for you, so that you could have a rich, fulfilling life with endless pleasures of taste, sight, and relationships. Even if some of your systems are broken, the majority of your body and brain are functioning beautifully if you are reading this or hearing it. If you are a grumbler, stop it! Be thankful for what you have been given.One of our goals here at CEH is to grow your appreciation for your body, the living things on our planet, the earth, and the universe, so that we all become more humble and thankful before God. If anyone should be thankful, it should be us, with all that science has revealed about the details. Yet this is a proud, stubborn, arrogant generation—just like in the days of Noah. There will be a stern warning given in the last days to grumblers. Revelation 14 predicts a mighty angel delivering this message to all those who remain in rebellion against their Maker: “Fear God, and give him glory, for the hour of his judgment has come; and worship him who made the heaven and the earth, the sea, and the springs of water” (Revelation 14:7). That’s a command. Don’t put off obedience till it’s too late. (Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

first_imgSouth Africa’s Paralympic Team has continued to make waves in Beijing following Natalie du Toit’s first gold in the S9 100 metres butterfly on Sunday. By the close of action on day three, the team had won five gold medals and one bronze. Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material She still has the free rider section to contest and is looking eagerly forward to it because it is her favourite event. Phillipa Johnson, who won two silver medals four years ago in Athens, captured gold this time around in the equestrian competition on her horse, Benedict. His time was 1.27 seconds faster than the next fastest qualifier and a significant 3.58 ahead of the third placed swimmer. 10 September 2008 Gold medal chanceThe chances of South Africa adding another medal in the swimming pool were enhanced early on day four, 10 September, when Kevin Paul, swimming in the heats of the men’s SB9 100 metres breaststroke, broke the world record in a time of one minute 08.70 seconds. Du Toit is aiming for five gold medals in Beijing; so far, so good… On Monday, Du Toit followed up her victory in the butterfly with a second title in the 100 metres freestyle. Despite a slow start, she was clearly the fastest swimmer in the field and pulled away for a convincing victory in one minute, 1.44 seconds. Oscar PistoriusOn Tuesday, Oscar Pistorius was in action in the final of the men’s T44 100 metres as the fastest qualifier. Also in the line-up was another South African, Arnu Fourie. “It has been a little tough, going from the 10-kilometre to the sprint, and I definitely thought I would have enough time to taper, but it seems that I haven’t quite tapered just enough,” she admitted.center_img He described his victory as “a dream come true”. In track and field events Nicholas Newman appeared to be on course for victory in the men’s F35 javelin event when he threw a world record 42.28 metres. However, that mark was then bettered by Poland’s Pawel Piotrowski and China’s Wei Guo, which left Newman with a bronze medal. World recordCharl Bouwer also won gold in the pool for South Africa. Swimming in the S14 400 metres freestyle, he smashed the previous world record by two seconds to win in four minutes, 14.02 seconds. It was an improvement of 10 seconds over his previous best. ‘The Flying Fish’Du Toit, referred to in the Chinese press as “the Flying Fish”, told East Coast Radio she could have done better and said her finish was not as good as she would have hoped it would be; she had been hoping to break the one-minute barrier. Du Toit said her starts have not been up to scratch and admitted that she hadn’t spent enough time on them because she had been in training for the open water event at the Olympics. She went so far as to describe her starts as “embarrassing”, but said “I am a distance swimmer, so you’ll see me come back more in the second half of a race. A double-amputee, Pistorius was up against single amputees, but he managed to improve on his bronze medal showing of four years earlier by edging out the USA’s Jerome Singleton by just three-hundredths of a second in a thrilling finish. His winning time was 11.17 seconds. The defending champion, Marlon Shirley, who had qualified well behind Pistorius, crashed out at 60 metres, while Brian Frasure, who won silver in Athens, finished third. SA’s Fourie was fourth. Her time was a Paralympic record, but outside her own world record. Pistorius is aiming for a sweep of the 100, 200, and 400 metres and if any event was supposed to be his Achilles heel it was the 100 metres, so the chances of the sweep appear good. He holds the world records at all three distances and his aim, besides winning, is to set a new world record in the 400 metres. last_img read more

first_imgAbsa Capital, through working closely with its clients to solution an appropriate delivery vehicle, identified the need for an exchange traded option contract. To this end they worked closely with the JSE to ensure these contracts were listed and tradable. “The JSE realises that in order to be more competitive it needs to offer foreign exchange products that are viable alternatives to those traded in the OTC space,” Geers said. Both new contracts can be triggered anytime by the event. When it comes to fees, both products operate on a competitive sliding scale and will be capped at R39 900 per deal to entice bigger contracts. OTC instruments are not traded on a stock exchange and are typically contracts between an investment bank and a client. “As market participants seek to avoid bilateral counter-party risk and with more regulation being imposed, our new products offer a regulated alternative and compete directly with OTC contracts.” Product innovation On-market instruments require no foreign exchange clearance and are settled in rands. 15 June 2011 The two new options are based on the dollar/rand exchange rate and are “knock-out barrier options up-and-out and down-and-out”. They offer asset manager and hedge fund participants an exchange-traded product similar to what has previously only been available over-the-counter (OTC). “The products will allow investors to create more diversified trading strategies using exchange traded products without taking on any credit risk,” the JSE’s general manager of derivatives trading, Warren Geers, said in a statement this week. These options represent the first currency “can-do” contracts offered by the JSE. Can-do options are a type of product first created by the JSE in June 2006 to offer investors the flexibility of an OTC product with the credibility and transparency of the listed derivative. They offer infinite variety to the professional investor. In a bid to offer currency traders even greater choice and flexibility, the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) and Absa Capital have listed the first “exotic-style” currency options contracts. No foreign exchange clearance required Product innovation forms part of the JSE’s continued drive to grow the currency derivatives market by introducing new flexibility while ensuring that strict regulation is adhered to. SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

first_imgA new Y Combinator funded startup called GraffitiGeo has just launched with a fresh spin on user-generated reviews. The mobile application is somewhat like a mashup of review site Yelp, mobile social network Foursquare, and social news site Digg. The Digg-like element of the application is the easiest piece to use: like that restaurant? Vote it up. You can also leave more detailed comments to go along with your vote, if you so choose. To encourage people to participate in the “game” aspect to the app, GraffitiGeo also introduces a point system whose concept is borrowed from mobile app Foursquare…but is a bit more confusing. What’s more interesting than the mobile application launching now is the second GraffitiGeo app which is right around the corner. The next app will be an augmented reality application for the iPhone which takes the above elements and layers them over your iPhone’s viewfinder.Yelp + Digg + Foursquare = GraffitiGeo GraffitiGeo’s first mobile application will initially suffer from all the usual problems of sites and services that rely on user-generated reviews. Until enough people start using the service, there won’t be much value to it. While the concept behind the mobile review app is solid, its focus primarily on restaurants at the moment means it’s not likely to attract a large user base right off the bat. There are already a large number of mobile restaurant applications out there, not to mention there’s Yelp, which does restaurant reviews and a lot more. The GraffitiGeo team acknowledges they have competition in this area, but are quick to point out the others’ shortcomings. For example, Yelp reviews are too long – especially in “the day and age of Twitter,” they write on their blog. They also incorporate the Digg-like voting element for fast rankings (which Yelp does not), offer Facebook Connect integration for easy sign in, introduce nifty heatmaps to highlight the hotspots, and let you leave a comment with only 2 taps (Yelp takes 5-6). In short, they feel they’ve designed an application specifically for the mobile platform where Yelp just ported their successful website to mobile instead. The Digg-like voting aspect is probably the app’s killer feature. Instead of star ratings or lengthy reviews, you can simply vote “thumbs up” in order to rate a restaurant positively or a “thumbs down” if you’re not so pleased. This ease-of-use makes the barrier to entry that much lower and could encourage more participation from casual users.Another element to GraffitiGeo is the game aspect. This may or may not be a plus, in our opinion. With inspiration obviously borrowed from mobile social network/game Foursquare, GraffitiGeo awards points for any activity, whether that’s a vote, a comment, or anything else. After reaching 100 points (aka “street cred”), you can start or join a “mob.” Not a violent mob, of course, just a “mob.” Mobs can claim territories which, in turn, unlocks more features in the application. There are also badges which can be earned. The entire setup is explained here. It’s a bit complex and frankly, we’re not sure if this is the sort of app that needs a gameplay element. If you’re trying to find out if a restaurant is worth trying out, you’re probably more interested in reading reviews and checking ratings than you are in playing with a bunch of online friends. Even Better: An Augmented Reality VersionThe real trick up GraffitiGeo’s sleeve, however, is the app that’s yet to come. Basically, the next app from GraffitiGeo is an augmented reality version of what’s described above. That sounds much more appealing, to be honest. With the iPhone’s viewfinder, you scan the restaurant in question and GraffitiGeo comments will float across your screen. What’s really cool about the AR app, though, is that you don’t necessarily have to have a restaurant in the viewfinder to see these ratings. Because the app is location-based, it knows what’s nearby. In the demo, they aim the app down the street from where they’re standing and GraffitiGeo displays the ratings for all the restaurants on that block. If you’re ever just wandering around looking for a place to eat, this could be a real timesaver. We imagine you’ll then be able to interact with the app in other ways, too, but that’s hard to tell from the YouTube video demo. GraffitiGeo’s first effort may or may not be worth your time, especially considering its already robust competition, but the AR app definitely looks worth the wait. Tags:#Features#mobile#Product Reviews#web sarah perez Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Related Posts Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more