first_imgNo need to feel insignificant in a lonely universe. You are loaded with great equipment for an exciting life.Grab a cup of coffee: How common, how simple; gripping a cup or other object. Do you realize what that involves? Ask any robot designer who tries to program a machine to do it. Researchers at Brown University studied how the brain plans for gripping an object. It kept them pretty busy. They found that “the brain can formulate different grips on the same object or the same grip on different objects.”Eye coordination: You’re not a cyclops. You have two eyes, but how does the brain put the two inputs together, so that you see a single unified image? Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison looked into that, and found that three visual centers in the brain work to unify the visual field. See details in the UWM press release.Stable view: “Without us being aware of it, our eyes constantly perform tiny corrections of their viewing direction,” a press release from the University of Tubingen begins. Seeking to understand these movements, called saccades (and tinier movements called microsaccades), “They have discovered a direct link between tiny eye movements and the focusing of attention needed to perceive our visual environment.” There’s a purpose in these seemingly-negligible microsaccades that go on unconsciously and automatically. “This mechanism allows our brain to ‘keep an eye out’ even when our eyes are busy, keeping tabs on the environment, warning of danger, and thus allowing our active perception to rapidly re-focus on anything that might happen.”Twitter for cells: Like the chatter on the internet, your body’s cells talk to one another in a multitude of ways. That’s the subject of an interesting article on Medical Xpress that shows how intercellular communication provides division of labor,  signaling, and functional coordination.Brain’s got rhythm: Consider your brain’s challenge. “The human brain has 86 billion or so neurons all trying to talk to each other in this incredibly messy, noisy and electrochemical soup,” a lead researcher from Berkeley says in Science Daily. The brain’s rhythmic waves and periodic synchronizations, like downbeats, help “brain networks quickly come together and break apart as needed.” The Duke Ellington reference in the title is clever: “It don’t mean a thing if the brain ain’t got that swing.”4-D Organization: Speaking of rhythm, we all keep sync with rhythmic cycles of day and night, seasons and years. Researchers publishing in PNAS tried to decipher the “4-D nucleome,” how our genetic code acts in time. Looking at the human genome as a dynamical system, they “interrogated the dynamical relationship between genome architecture (structure) and gene expression (function) and its impact on phenotype,” and found some interesting patterns:Using genome-wide intragene and intergene contact maps, we identified gene networks with high potential for coregulation and colocalization, consistent with expression via transcription factories. In an intriguing example, we found periodic movements of circadian genes in three dimensions that entrained with expression.Bone repair: Aren’t you glad bones can heal? This doesn’t just happen. It took planning and design for there to be bone progenitor cells ready to fix things, and protocols to get them working. A paper in PNAS shows that there are layers of readiness in the system. “Our results indicate that the skeletal progenitor population is functionally stratified, containing distinct subsets responsible for growth, regeneration, and repair. Furthermore, our findings suggest that injury-induced changes to the skeletal stem and progenitor microenvironments could activate these cells and enhance their regenerative potential.”More than a sperm donor: Sexual reproduction is a couples thing. Both sexes contribute to one another and the next generation in unique, crucial ways. One might think a male just contributes his sperm and is done with it, but there’s more to semen than sperm. New Scientist reports that “Semen has controlling power over female genes and behaviour.”Tongue update: Time to rewrite the textbooks on taste. “That neat and tidy map of tastes on the tongue you learned in school is all wrong,” Medical Xpress says. But is anything in biology simple when you look at it in detail? “Indeed, results from a number of experiments indicate that all areas of the mouth containing taste buds – including several parts of the tongue, the soft palate (on the roof of your mouth) and the throat – are sensitive to all taste qualities.”Readers of the Pentateuch can’t fail to be impressed with God’s anger at grumblers. These news items show why. It’s a crime to be thankless for the gifts we have been given. Look at any one of these magnificent wonders in the human body; how could anyone fail to be astonished at the level of creative genius behind them? He made it for you, so that you could have a rich, fulfilling life with endless pleasures of taste, sight, and relationships. Even if some of your systems are broken, the majority of your body and brain are functioning beautifully if you are reading this or hearing it. If you are a grumbler, stop it! Be thankful for what you have been given.One of our goals here at CEH is to grow your appreciation for your body, the living things on our planet, the earth, and the universe, so that we all become more humble and thankful before God. If anyone should be thankful, it should be us, with all that science has revealed about the details. Yet this is a proud, stubborn, arrogant generation—just like in the days of Noah. There will be a stern warning given in the last days to grumblers. Revelation 14 predicts a mighty angel delivering this message to all those who remain in rebellion against their Maker: “Fear God, and give him glory, for the hour of his judgment has come; and worship him who made the heaven and the earth, the sea, and the springs of water” (Revelation 14:7). That’s a command. Don’t put off obedience till it’s too late. (Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

first_imgLiverpool boss Klopp on Newcastle thrashing: We can perform betterby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool boss Jurgen Klopp says his team can perform better after their 4-0 thumping of Newcastle United.The Reds led 1-0 at half-time on Boxing Day thanks to Dejan Lovren’s powerful early strike, and Mohamed Salah’s penalty doubled their advantage in the opening stages of the second half.Xherdan Shaqiri made it three by rounding off a slick team move with 11 minutes remaining, before substitute Fabinho completed the scoring with his first Liverpool goal.Klopp said afterwards, “It was difficult. It is always difficult. I liked the start offensively, but I didn’t like the start defensively – the protection was not as it should have been. We were not as compact as we should have been. They had the first corner, half-counters and stuff like that, so it looked like kind of an open game. When we had the ball, after the first 15 minutes, we were good – one-twos, good finishes. We lost the formation a little bit, we were too wide offensively. “If we could play the ball in behind it was good, but if they could clear it with a header then we were not there to win the ball back formation-wise. 1-0, a fantastic goal, quick in mind; again it was off a set-piece, which is brilliant. A fantastic cross and then a good reaction from pretty much everybody in the box, then a fantastic finish from Dejan. I was really happy about half-time [so that] we could adjust a few things and go back to the way we actually wanted to play. That made life easier, especially after we scored with the penalty in minute 47 – pretty early in the second half. Then we controlled the game, which was good. “We scored wonderful goals again, set-pieces fantastic. Even Ali could show – apart from all his football-play skills – what his actual job is and saves the clean sheet. A pretty perfect day for us; not a perfect performance, but a really good performance. Result-wise and a lot of parts of the performance, really good.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Man Utd push Luca Ercolani to open new contract talksby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United have kicked off talks with Luca Ercolani about a new deal.The young Italian defender has impressed for the U18s this season.TMW says Ercolani’s current deal expires in June and United have approached his agent about negotiations over a new contract.The defender is keen, though is fielding interest from home and across Europe.Ercolani, 19, has been capped at U20 level by Italy. read more

first_imgWashington: The United States on Tuesday voiced fears of many countries that following abrogation of Jammu and Kashmir special status, Pakistani militants might launch terror strikes in India unless Pakistan “keep a lid on militant groups”. I think many have concerns that Pakistan keep a lid on militant groups that might conduct cross-border activities as a result of the Kashmir decisions, and I don’t sense that China wants that kind of conflict or would support that, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Indo Pacific Security Affairs, Randall Shriver, told a Washington audience. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss account details under automatic exchange framework Shriver was responding to a question on China’s support to Pakistan on the issue of Kashmir after India nullified articles 370 and 35A of its the Constitution that gave special privileges to Jammu and Kashmir. I think it (China’s support to Pakistan on Kashmir) is mostly diplomatic and political support, Shriver said. They (Chinese) have supported Pakistan in international fora. There is some discussion about whether or not Kashmir would be taken up in the UN, China would support that. But in terms of something beyond that or more active, I don’t see it, the top Pentagon official said. Also Read – Afghan Taliban frees 3 Indian hostages in exchange for 11 top militant leaders: Reports China has a long-standing relationship with Pakistan, and they have growing competition with India, he said, adding that India seeks a stable relationship with China. Referring to the ongoing visit of India’s External Affairs Minister S Jaishankar, Shriver said the US is having consultations with him. We have talked about the relationship with China. They want a stable relationship with China, but there’s no doubt that there is growing concern and competition there as well. So I think on a range of issues to include Kashmir, China has leaned toward Pakistan, Shriver said.last_img read more

first_imgMUMBAI/DHAKA: From Kathmandu to Colombo, it’s a kitchen nightmare: Onion prices have gone crazy. That’s because India, the world’s biggest seller of the Asian diet staple, has banned exports after extended Monsoon downpours delayed harvests and supplies shrivelled. And dedicated buyers across the region, like Nepalese housewife Seema Pokharel, are flummoxed. “This is a terrible increase,” said Pokharel, out shopping for vegetables in Kathmandu. “Onion prices have more than doubled in the last month alone.” Also Read – Commercial vehicle sales to remain subdued in current fiscal: IcraWhether it’s Pakistani chicken curry, Bangladeshi biryani or Indian sambar, Asian consumers have developed a serious dependence on Indian onion supplies for go-to dishes. Shorter shipment times than from rival exporters like China or Egypt play a crucial role in preserving the taste of the perishable commodity. But last Sunday New Delhi banned all exports from India after local prices jumped to 4,500 rupees ($63.30) per 100 kg, their highest in nearly six years, due to the delay in summer-sown crop arrivals triggered by longer, heavier rains than usual. Also Read – Ashok Leyland stock tanks over 5 pc as co plans to suspend production for up to 15 daysSince the ban, countries such as Bangladesh have turned to the likes of Myanmar, Egypt, Turkey and China to increase supplies in a bid bring prices down, government officials and traders said. But the hefty volumes lost will be hard to replace. India exported 2.2 million tonnes of fresh onions in the 2018/19 fiscal year ended March 31, according to data from India’s Agricultural and Processed Food Products Export Development Authority. That’s more than half of all imports by Asian countries, traders estimate. Rising prices of alternative supplies will add to the headache for importers trying to get the vegetable from elsewhere, said Mohammad Idris, a trader based in Dhaka. In the Bangladesh capital, consumers are now being asked to pay 120 taka ($1.42) per kilogramme for their prized onions – twice the price a fortnight ago and the highest since December, 2013. “Prices are going up elsewhere in Asia and Europe,” said Idris. “Other exporting countries are taking advantage of the Indian ban” to raise their asking price. In response to the crisis, the government of Bangladesh has initiated sales of subsidised onions through the state-run Trading Corporation of Bangladesh (TCB). “We are looking for all possible options to import onions. Our target is to import in the shortest possible time,” said TCB spokesman Humayun Kabir. But the shipments from elsewhere – Iran and Turkey are also potential suppliers – that authorities in countries across the region are investigating will all take time. “It takes one month when it comes from Egypt and about 25 days from China, while it takes only a few days from India,” said Dhaka trader Idris. The need for alternative imports is so severe, though, that countries like Sri Lanka have already placed orders with Egypt and China, said G Rajendran, president of the Essential Food Commodities, Importers and Traders Association. Onion prices in Sri Lanka have risen by 50 per cent in a week, to 280-300 Sri Lankan rupees ($1.7) per kilogramme. For other countries, there may be little option but to sit tight and hope for the best. Malaysia, the second-biggest buyer of Indian onions, expects the ban to be temporary and sees no reason to panic, said Sim Tze Tzin, deputy minister of agriculture. But even India has been importing onions from Egypt in an effort to calm prices. And there won’t be any meaningful drop in prices before summer-sown crops start to hit the market, said Ajit Shah, president of the Mumbai-based Onion Exporters’ Association. That’s not expected until mid-November, meaning the export ban isn’t going away in the near term. “India could resume exports once prices drop, but it will take time,” said Shah. “Until India resumes exports, supplies will remain limited in Asia.” For now, consumers like Kathmandu shopper Pokharel are having to change habits across Asia. “I went to buy 5 kilogrammes of onions for our five-member family but ended up buying only 3 kilogrammes due to higher prices,” said Afroza Mimi, a Dhaka housewife on a shopping expedition the day after India imposed the export ban. “They (traders) are selling old stock nearly at double the price. This is crazy.”last_img read more

first_imgKabul: Afghanistan Cricket Board (ACB) has appointed Andy Moles, who has been a key influence in the rise of the national team, as their director of cricket. The 58-year-old, who is an English cricket coach and former cricketer who played first-class cricket for Warwickshire and Griqualand West, has also been appointed as their chief selector. “Andy Moles appointed as Director of Cricket and Chief Selector. Mr. Moles served as interim head coach of Afghanistan in the recently concluded tour of Bangladesh. He has a vast experience of over 25 years in the sport and is a Level-4 Coach as well,” ACB tweeted on Thursday. Last week, former South Africa all-rounder Lance Klusener was appointed as the head coach of Afghanistan for a tenure running up to 2020. Klusener had replaced Phil Simmons, whose 18-month stint with the national side ended with their last-place finish in the World Cup.last_img read more