first_img Tags: Black Hills State/Dixie State/Jake Connor/Matt Conway/RMAC/South Dakota Mines/Westminster Brad James Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSALT LAKE CITY-Jake Connor posted 24 points as he went 4 of 6 behind the arc in leading the Westminster Griffins to a 68-64 win over Dixie State Saturday at Behnken Fieldhouse in the Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference season opener for both squads.The Trailblazers were paced by Matt Conway, who netted 23 points and 7 rebounds, while going 7-11 from the field. Dixie State fell to 2-2 with the loss. The Griffins improved to 3-2 on the season and will next visit Black Hills State Friday as they ensue in RMAC play. Dixie State will be at South Dakota Mines Friday evening. December 2, 2018 /Sports News – Local Westminster Edges Dixie State in RMAC Season Openerlast_img read more

first_img UM honors Judge Hoeveler May 15, 2002 Regular News The University of Miami School of Law’s Center for Ethics and Public Service recently honored U.S. District Judge William M. Hoeveler with its First Annual William M. Hoeveler Award.The award was created to honor those who exemplify ethics and leadership in the legal profession. Judge Hoeveler received the inaugural award named in his honor at a special reception at the Federal Courthouse in downtown Miami.“The Hoeveler Award is being established by the center to honor devotion to ethics and leadership not only in bar and bench, but also in the civic community,” said UM Law Professor Anthony Alfieri, director of the law school’s Center for Ethics and Public Service. Recently honored with the Miami-Dade County Commission for Ethics and Public Trust’s ARETE award, the center also recognizes the contributions of those in the legal profession with its Lawyers in Leadership Award.An adjunct professor at UM’s Law School since 1995, Judge Hoeveler serves on the Advisory Board of the school’s Center for Ethics and Public Service. He was appointed to the federal bench in 1977, and chaired the Standing Committee on Professionalism for The Florida Bar from 1992-94.He was named best district judge in the 11th Circuit by The American Lawyer in 1983, and received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Greater Miami Jewish Federation in 1991.center_img UM honors Judge Hoevelerlast_img read more

first_imgDeseret News 17 March 2018Family First Comment: “Utah lawmakers said they were prompted to pass the law after seeing other states where parents had been investigated and in some cases had their children temporarily removed when people reported seeing kids playing basketball in their yards or walking to school alone. Headline-grabbing cases have included a Maryland couple investigated after allowing their 10- and-6-year-old children to walk home alone from a park in 2015. Republican Sen. Lincoln Fillmore of South Jordan has said allowing kids to try things alone helps prepare them for the future, though some have raised concerns the law could be used as defenses in child-abuse cases if not carefully deployed.”We may need a “Let Parents Be Parents” law in NZ….So-called free-range parenting will soon be the law of the land in Utah after the governor signed what appears to be the country’s first measure to formally legalize allowing kids to do things on their own to foster self-sufficiency.The bill, which Gov. Gary Herbert announced Friday that he’d signed, specifies that it isn’t neglectful to let kids do things alone like travel to school, explore a playground or stay in the car. The law takes effect May 8.Utah’s law is the first in the country, said Lenore Skenazy, who coined the term free-range parent. A records search by the National Conference of State Legislatures didn’t turn up any similar legislation in other states.Utah lawmakers said they were prompted to pass the law after seeing other states where parents had been investigated and in some cases had their children temporarily removed when people reported seeing kids playing basketball in their yards or walking to school alone.Headline-grabbing cases have included a Maryland couple investigated after allowing their 10- and-6-year-old children to walk home alone from a park in 2015.Republican Sen. Lincoln Fillmore of South Jordan has said allowing kids to try things alone helps prepare them for the future, though some have raised concerns the law could be used as defenses in child-abuse cases if not carefully deployed.The law states the child must be mature enough to handle those things but leaves the age purposely open-ended so police and prosecutors can work on a case-by-case basis, Fillmore has said.READ MORE: https://www.deseretnews.com/article/900013224/utah-governor-signs-law-legalizing-free-range-parenting.htmllast_img read more

first_imgFreshman forward Brendan Woods broke his femur and dislocated his knee in a nasty collision while playing in the USHL in 2009.[/media-credit]If you grow up in a hockey family, especially one where your father is a former professional hockey player and assistant coach for the four-time defending NHL Southeast Division champion team, it’s pretty difficult to breathe and bleed anything other than hockey.It’s probably a big reason why Wisconsin freshman forward Brendan Woods’ father, Washington Capitals assistant coach Bob Woods, gave his son a funny look when he said he wanted to be a baseball player during a dual interview when Brendan was younger.Brendan has certainly found his way though, despite his momentary dream of being a baseball player, realizing the potential he possessed in hockey and taking advantage of the benefits of having such strong hockey roots.“It comes natural,” Woods said. “You are around it all the time, and it kind of sets you one step ahead of everyone else. You know what to expect.”Wisconsin head coach Mike Eaves added that while final determinations during the recruitment of a player come down to individual traits on and off the ice, coming from a solid hockey environment certainly doesn’t hurt a player’s chances.Woods chose to come to Wisconsin and play for Eaves after being courted by other national hockey powers such as Minnesota, North Dakota and Colorado College, with hopes of winning an NCAA Championship and receiving the necessary preparation to continue to the NHL.“What Coach Eaves has done with guys in the past, he’s been there, he knows what it takes [to play in the NHL], so it’s just putting myself in his hands, knowing that I am in the right place, and I know if I give him all I got, he’s going to get me somewhere, and that’s what I am looking forward to,” Woods said.But for a brief moment, it looked like which college Woods decided to play for had little relevance. In his 2009-10 USHL rookie season playing for the Chicago Steel, Woods suffered a terrible injury. He broke his femur and dislocated his knee on a leg-on-leg collision while in possession of the puck.“It’s always in the back of my mind,” Woods said. “I wish it didn’t happen; I wonder where I would be strength-wise and even hockey-wise. [At the time] I was uncommitted, but I was having colleges call me, which was a great thing for me to have, because me sitting on the couch wasn’t the greatest thing for me to be doing. Having them call me and letting me know they cared and still had faith and potential and all, that was a good thing.”While many people played critical roles in his recovery and maintenance of a positive attitude, it was Brendan’s father who really helped push him through.“He has always been there for me,” Woods said. “I had that traumatic injury with my knee, and we kind of put hockey aside there. I was wondering what I’m going to do, but he was a dad. He was there for me, he was there to encourage me and give me the positives out of it.”The injury still had an impact, keeping Woods from being drafted in 2010 despite being ranked as the No. 83 skater in North America by the NHL Central Scouting Bureau. He then dropped to No. 147 in 2011 and was bypassed once more.“The year of my draft year it hurt, but if you look at the positives of not being drafted I could have all teams wanting me,” Woods said. “The hockey world is crazy sometimes. You are going to run into things that are going to tear you to pieces inside, but you have to dig deep and find out what it’s going to take.”Now that he is back on the ice and contributing nicely for the Badgers, Woods has four points on the season and Eaves sees encouraging signs of the type of player he can envision Woods becoming.Matching his skills with his physical stature increases the value of Woods to the Badgers even more. Eaves cites Woods’ 6-foot-3 frame and ability to move up and down the ice with good speed as key reasons why he still has what it takes to be an NHL player.“He is just hard to play against. In the corner he can protect pucks,” Eaves said. “The power play goal that we scored up in St. Cloud, he was a direct result of being in front, being a big body that was hacking and whacking at it, so his presence on the ice can be felt in many ways.”If Woods is fortunate enough to be drafted into the NHL and play at the next level, would Brendan want to grow his family hockey roots even deeper by playing for his dad and the Capitals?“Of course not,” Woods says. “I just want to play against him. I don’t think I could handle him screaming at me. He would probably be the hardest. If you ask any kid that plays for their parent, mom or dad, they are always going to be hardest on you, so you would rather play against them and beat them and be able to smile at them across the ice, just letting him know you got the better side of him.”last_img read more

first_imgDarjeeling: With the bipartite talks between the management and tea trade unions ending in a deadlock, the unions have demanded the immediate intervention of the state government in the next round of talks to be tripartite in nature. The trade unions have also lined up a series of agitation programmes to add more muscle to their demand, including blockade on the dispatch of tea.Incidentally, five rounds of bipartite talks between the management and trade unions ended in a stalemate with the workers demanding 20 percent bonus and the management unwilling to pay more than 10.50 percent. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaA rally was organized by all the operation tea gardens united in Darjeeling town on Wednesday with tea garden workers participating. The rally culminated in a public meeting at the Darjeeling Motor stand. An indoor meeting was also held, attended by representatives of all trade unions. “The bipartite talks have failed. We demand immediate intervention of the State Government. Tripartite talks will have to be held to break the stalemate,” said Amar Lama, representing the Jan Andolan Party (JAP.) Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highwayThe trade unions have decided to stop the dispatch of tea from the tea gardens starting from Thursday. “Along with this the workers will observe “go slow” from 8am to 9:30am every day. During this time the staff and sub staff working in the tea garden offices will observe pen down,” added Lama. The tea trade unions have made an appeal to the entire Hills to express solidarity with the tea garden workers. “Tea is the economic mainstay of this region. Not only 60,000 odd workers but more than 2 and a half lakh people (workers and their dependents) are looking forward to the bonus. They contribute a major share to the local economy starting from vehicles, garment shops and eateries are all dependent on them. The entire hill market is waiting for the bonus, so all should come forward to express solidarity with the workers,” Lama said. In a symbolic gesture, the trade unions have appealed to all the shops throughout the hills to down their shutters halfway from 1 pm to 3pm on Friday. “We also appeal to all the political parties and public representatives to support the cause of the workers,” said Lama. Anit Thapa, Chairman, GTA has expressed solidarity with the workers. “After the 104 day bandh in 2017, the tea gardens have not faced a single day bandh hence. I have written to the Chief Minister and the Darjeeling Tea Association that the workers should be given 20% bonus,” stated Thapa.last_img read more