first_imgLeeds (6) 13 Tries: Paul Cons: Jarvis Pens: Jarvis 2Northampton (10) 23 Tries: Myler, Diggin Cons: Myler 2 Pens: Myler 3After an important victory for Leeds Carnegie at home to London Irish last week, their hopes for Premiership survival had been rekindled, but these were soon doused by an efficient Northampton Saints team who looked to struggle very little from the loss of their Six Nations contingent, contrary to much of their recent form. Carrying on their impressive form from the week before, Leeds took an early lead with an Adrian Jarvis penalty, but this lead was not to last long as Leeds full-back Michael Stephenson dropped a kick from Stephen Myler, with Myler himself running on through to capitalise and score a try, before going on to convert.  The rest of the first half played out fairly uneventfully with Jarvis and Myler sharing a penalty apiece as the Saints went into the break 10-6 up. Saints class began to show in the second-half however, and two more Myler penalties took the game beyond a tired looking Leeds side. This lead was then compounded by a neat inside pass from Myler which found Paul Diggin, and the winger had no problem running in his side’s second try, and an epic performance from Myler continued as he converted the try, taking his side’s point tally to 23. Leeds managed to conjure up a consolation try through Danny Paul, and despite Jarvis registering the conversion; his last minute penalty miss meant that Carnegie failed to score themselves a losing bonus point. With Leeds unable to score back-to-back home victories, especially over a Saints side who were on a very poor run of form, it seems difficult to see them managing to fight their way out of the drop zone, and their next fixture away at Sale could seal their fate, unless they record anything other than a win over their relegation rivals.Sunday 13th March 2011 GLOUCESTER, ENGLAND – NOVEMBER 27: Gloucester’s Dave Lewis during the Aviva Premiership match between Gloucester and Saracens at Kingsholm Stadium on November 27, 2010 in Gloucester, England. (Photo by Tim Keeton/Getty Images) Rugby World reader Alex Shaw takes a look at this weekend’s LV CUp semi-finals, and the single Aviva Premiership match, which were lost a little in an exciting RBS 6 Nations weekend, but still provided two cracking, and compelling, rugby occasions.LV= Cup Semi-Finals (and Leeds vs. Northampton)Harlequins (13) 20 Tries: Dickson, Brown Cons: Clegg 2 Pens: Clegg 2Newcastle (6) 21 Tries: Gopperth, Tu’ipulotu Cons: Gopperth Pens: Gopperth 3Despite Newcastle Falcons well earned victory over Harlequins a week before at Kingston Park, the trip down to the Stoop had almost everyone predicting a Harlequins victory. However, Newcastle, with a place in the final in their sights, were to prove all their critics wrong in this LV= Cup semi-final. The game started much as expected for Conor O’Shea’s side as Karl Dickson went over for Quins, with Rory Clegg converting, before adding two further penalties, with the Falcons only able to offer two Jimmy Gopperth penalties in resistance as the sides went in 13-6 at the break. Gopperth then went on to convert his own try at the beginning of the second half, levelling the scores, which perhaps belied Quins dominance in the game so far. However, their dominance soon began to tell as Mike Brown dived over to re-take the lead for Quins, before Clegg added the extras. As the game drew to a close though, Gopperth kicked a penalty to keep the Falcons within four points of Quins, before Tane Tu’ipulotu powered over in injury time to make the score 21-20 and complete an exhilarating end to a game which Falcons fans will long remember. With the final against Gloucester just a week away, and their rampant victory over Newport fresh in their minds, the smart money will once again be on the Falcons to lose, but Alan Tait is not one for believing in the odds. If the Falcons can gain parity in the set piece, and half-backs Mickey Young and Gopperth can unleash a backline consisting of talents such as Gcobani Bobo and Alex Tait, then the Falcons can be in contention right up to the 80th minute.Saturday 12th March 2011 Gloucester (17) 45 Tries: Hazell, Fuimaono-Sapolu, Robinson, Sharples 4Cons: Robinson 5Newport Gwent-Dragons (0) 17 Tries: Jones, Brew, Groves Cons: ToveyAn in-form Gloucester hosted the Newport Gwent-Dragons in the second LV= Cup semi-final, with the winner facing the Newcastle Falcons in a week at Franklin’s Gardens. Despite the Dragons owning the accolade of being the only Welsh region to have made it past the group stages of any cup competition this season, they were to be no match for a free-scoring Gloucester. The first half was a distinctly one-sided affair, with Gloucester going into the break 17-0 up, thanks to tries from Andy Hazell, Eliota Fuimaono-Sapolu and Nicky Robinson, with Robinson adding a sole conversion.  Although Gloucester seemed to switch off defensively after the break, and conceded tries to Adam Rhys Jones, Aled Brew and Jevon Groves, the second-half could best be described as the Charlie Sharples show, the winger crossing the line four times to ensure the game was well out of reach for the Dragons. Though it would be unfair to attribute no praise to the Newport offence, who began to look far more clinical in the second-half, Gloucester’s defensive frailties will have worried coach Bryan Redpath, and taken the shine off of what could have been a very pleasing win for the Scotsman. Although they go into next week’s final against Newcastle as clear favourites, Gloucester should take nothing for granted, especially in a week where the mighty French were humbled by the Italians, and will have to ensure they do the basics well before they even think about trying to exhibit their arguably more proficient brand of skilful running rugby. No matter who comes out on top next week at Twickenham, we can be assured of an exciting game from two teams determined to bring home the first silverware of the season, and will leave everything they have out on the pitch. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

first_imgThe women’s bid for Olympic gold in the rugby sevens starts on Saturday, and we have the busy schedule for a packed three days listed below. Australia are the top seeds, with New Zealand and Canada also expected to do well. In addition to the medal matches, keep an eye out for Brazil, Colombia, Japan and Kenya; whichever finishes highest in the tournament rankings will earn a spot on the women’s circuit next year. Curtain raiser: France and Spain women will open the Olympic sevens LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Saturday 6th AugustSession One (from 3pm on BBC)Deodoro StadiumMatch 1 (15:00 – 15:20) Pool B – France v SpainMatch 2 (15:30 – 15:50) Pool B – New Zealand v KenyaMatch 3 (16:00 – 16:20) Pool C – Great Britain v BrazilMatch 4 (16:30 – 16:50) Pool C – Canada v JapanMatch 5 (17:00 – 17:20) Pool A – USA v FijiMatch 6 (17:30 – 17:50) Pool A – Australia v ColombiaSession Two (from 8pm on BBC)Match 7 (20:00 – 20:20) Pool B – France v KenyaMatch 8 (20:30 – 20:50) Pool B – New Zealand v SpainMatch 9 (21:00 – 21:20) Pool C – Great Britain v JapanMatch 10 (21:30 – 21:50) Pool C – Canada v BrazilMatch 11 (22:00 – 22:20) Pool A – USA v ColombiaMatch 12 (22:30 – 22:50) Pool A – Australia v FijiOh Canada: Kayla Moleschi charges forwardSunday 7th AugustSession Three (from 3pm on BBC)Deodoro StadiumMatch 13 (15:00 – 15:20) Pool B – Spain v Kenya Match 14 (15:30 – 15:50) Pool B – New Zealand v FranceMatch 15 (16:00 – 16:20) Pool C – Brazil v JapanMatch 16 (16:30 – 16:50) Pool C – Canada v Great Britaincenter_img Match 17 (17:00 – 17:20) Pool A – Fiji v ColombiaMatch 18 (17:30 – 17:50) Pool A – Australia v USAPlay-offs/quarter-finals (from 8pm on BBC)Match 19 (20:00 – 20:20) Play-off – Seed 9 v Seed 12Match 20 (20:30 – 20:50) Play-off – Seed 10 v Seed 11Match 21 (21:00 – 21:20) Medal QF1 – 1st Pool A v Seed 8Match 22 (21:30 – 21:50) Medal QF2 – 2nd Pool C v 2nd Pool BMatch 23 (22:00 – 22:20) Medal QF3 – 1st Pool C v 2nd Pool AMatch 24 (22:30 – 22:50) Medal QF4 – 1st Pool B v Seed 7Centimetres: Australia’s Tiana Penitani dots over against FranceMonday 8th AugustSemi-finals from 4.30pm, Finals from 21:30 (on BBC)Deodoro StadiumMatch 25 (16:30 – 16:50) 11th Place Play-off – Loser Game 19 v Loser Game 20Match 26 (17:00 – 17:20) 9th Place Play-off – Winner Game 19 v Winner Game 20Match 27 (17:30 – 17:50) 5th Place Semi-final – Loser Game 21 v Loser Game 22Match 28 (18:00 – 18:20) 5th Place Semi-final – Loser Game 23 v Loser Game 24Match 29 (18:30 – 18:50) Medal Semi-final – Winner Game 21 v Winner Game 22Match 30 (19:00 – 19:20) Medal Semi-final – Winner Game 23 v Winner Game 24Match 31 (21:30 – 21:50) 7th Place Playoff – Loser Game 27 v Loser Game 28Match 32 (22:00 – 22:20) 5th Place Play-off – Winner Game 27 v Winner Game 28Match 33 (22:30 – 22:50) Bronze Medal Match – Loser Game 29 v Loser Game 30 Match 34 (23:00 – 23:20) Gold Medal Match – Winner Game 29 v Winner Game 30For the latest Rugby World subscription offers click here and find out how to download the digital edition here.last_img read more

first_img Spain One Win Away From Rugby World CupLos Leones, ran out 84-10 winners against Germany last weekend to set up possible automatic qualification for the World Cup in 2019.The victory was their second largest score ever, and means Spain head into the final round of the Rugby Europe Championship knowing victory over Belgium in Brussels on Saturday, will secure automatic qualification in the Europe 1 slot in Pool A.King Felipe was in attendance at the match in Madrid, along with 15,000 other rugby fans in a contest which failed to be competitive from the start. For more World Cup news, visit our website by clicking here.Also don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook and Twitter. After a huge victory against Germany last weekend, Spain are within touching distance of the World Cup. Los Leones: The Spanish rugby team are one win away from the Rugby World Cup (Getty Images) Their previous highest score was a 90-8 victory over the Czech Republic over two decades ago.But the Spanish got within one converted score of that record, as they scored eleven tries and a penalty try, running rampant against a Germany side who were outplayed in every aspect.Clearly, in the presence of the Webb Ellis Cup, and having not played in the tournament since 1999, Los Leones wanted to prove they belonged in the World Cup.Related: Should the Six Nations Have Relegation and Promotion?  They would go into Pool A which includes Ireland, Scotland and Japan at the moment.Pool B currently has New Zealand, South Africa, Italy and two spots still to be filled by Africa 1, and the Repechage winner.Pool C sits with England, France, Argentina, USA, and Tonga.Finally Pool D has Australia, Wales, Georgia, Fiji and Uruguay. Romania currently sit atop the RWC 2019 Qualification table by three points after a 62-12 victory against Belgium, however Spain have a game in hand on them.A Spanish victory would force Romania into a play-off match against Portugal and then the winner would play Samoa in home and away fixtures to determine the Play-off Winner spot in Pool A.last_img read more

first_img Cardiff Blues and Wales Women back-row Manon JohnesDate of birth 17 December 2000 Born Cardiff Region Blues Country Wales Position Back-rowWhen did you first play? I started playing tag rugby at seven at CRICC, where Jamie Roberts and Rhys Patchell started. When I had to stop playing with boys, I joined Cardiff Quins and I also played for my school, Llandaff.What positions have you played? At first I played hooker, then I moved to the back row. I like playing there. I think it’s too structured in the backs and you get to do a bit of everything in the back row. Openside is probably my favourite.Which players did you grow up admiring? Sam Warburton is the obvious one. Sioned Harries, Rachel Taylor – anyone really in my position and playing at a high standard.Who’s been the biggest influence on you? I wouldn’t say one person – I’ve always wanted to achieve and set goals – but one of my PE teachers, Gwennan Harries, who used to play football for Wales, has always been very supportive. This impressive back-row made her Test debut aged just 17 LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Young run: Manon Johnes finds space for Wales against South Africa (Huw Evans Agency) center_img You’ve played senior regional rugby this season and made your Test debut at 17 in November… I was shocked! I’d been involved in the senior sevens set-up – I went to Australia last year – but 15s has always been the dream. I didn’t think it would come so soon.The main difference has been the physicality. It’s much easier to get the ball and jackal in U18 rugby; at senior and international level you get over the ball and the next second you’re on your bum. It’s challenging but will come with experience. The set-piece is a big step up too; it’s all about technique but I felt more comfortable the more I played.What are this year’s goals? I’d like to keep playing club rugby; I’ve played with those girls for a long time. My main goal is to play in the Six Nations.What about sevens? Sevens is great for developing skills like passing and speed. I’d be very happy to play sevens again but I probably prefer 15s.RW VERDICT: Currently working on A Levels in French, geography and RE, as well as a Welsh Baccalaureate, Johnes wants to study volcanology. She’s had an explosive start to her Wales career and is set to be on the scene for a long time. This article originally appeared in the February 2019 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

first_imgRelated: Twitter reacts to American Football star’s rugby claimThings will be very different today, but some fans may remember the cross-code challenges between Bath and Wigan back in 1996. Then, there were two matches – a league game and a union one.Code cracking: Jon Sleightholme breaks away from Jason Robinson (Getty Images)Former Bath and England wing Jon Sleightholme recently told Rugby World of those match-ups: “The hardest thing was the defensive aspect (Bath lost 82-6). Union has learnt so much from league and it has had a huge impact. We couldn’t get to grips with the defensive stuff. We were all absolutely blowing because it was so different and if you speak to the league boys they will say the same about the game at Twickenham (Bath won 44-19).”If a southern hemisphere clash can get off the ground, it would draw significant international attention. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Fired up: The Kangaroos in action last year (Getty Images) center_img New Zealand confirm discussions with Australia rugby league are underway The All Blacks facing off against rugby league’s famous Kangaroos of Australia, in an epic code clash? It may sound fanciful but it was confirmed today: talks are underway between both sides.It began with a report in Australia’s Courier Mail on Thursday that claimed a 14-a-side hybrid union-league contest between the All Blacks and Kangaroos was being lined up for early December. Later, New Zealand Rugby boss Mark Robinson explained that negotiations have been underway to explore a potentially lucrative event.“We’ve had an approach,” Robinson confirmed of the story. “We’ll work that through and go through the proper process… if we feel it has merit to take further.“It’s one of the many different options… we are considering.“It’s not new. The last time NZR had an approach was in 2017.”Considering it: The All Blacks may be open to the money-spinner (Getty Images)In the initial report, Kangaroos boss Mal Meninga said: “I’m keen to make this happen. We want to play the All Blacks, hopefully, we can get the concept off the ground,” adding that 5 December was the date being thrown around. last_img read more

first_img By Matthew DaviesPosted Jul 8, 2012 Ecumenical & Interreligious, Tags Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Shreveport, LA General Convention 2012 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing Featured Events Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release Press Release Service Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab General Convention, Curate Diocese of Nebraska Convention’s international guests find experience ‘mutually enriching’ Ecumenical, interreligious visitors highlight ‘work of common mission’ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Eastern Zambia Bishop William Mchombo, provincial secretary of Central Africa, Diocese of Cuba Bishop Griselda Delgado, and the Rev. Arthur Cavalcante, provincial secretary of the IEAB, are among the more than 40 international guests attending the 77th General Convention. Photo/Lynette Wilson[Episcopal News Service – Indianapolis] Representing more than half of the Anglican Communion’s 38 provinces, and many ecumenical and interreligious partners, guests attending General Convention spoke of their gratitude for the Episcopal Church’s hospitality as they gained a deeper understanding of its polity and legislative processes.Bishop William Mchombo of Eastern Zambia, provincial secretary of the Church of the Province of Central Africa, is attending General Convention for the first time. He described the Episcopal Church’s legislative processes as “unique” and “very complex,” but said that he is impressed by the background, detail and hard work that inform the discussions.“The final product comes from all the people,” he said, citing convention’s “careful deliberations” and noting that nobody can say they have been left out of the conversation. “We need to include everyone so that they have ownership” of the decisions taken at General Convention, he said.Addressing the media on July 8, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori said that including international, interfaith and ecumenical guests at General Convention is a “wonderful reminder of how we are connected across boundaries.”“When we learn from one another, we seek ways of working that we might not have expected,” she said. “We are learning what it means to be present in contexts that are unfamiliar and it’s one of the biggest challenges that we face right now.”The more than 40 international guests include many of the Anglican Communion’s primates, bishops and provincial secretaries, along with their spouses, from provinces throughout Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, North America, Oceania, the Pacific, and Central and South America.Many were invited and hosted by the presiding bishop’s office, in partnership with the Church Pension Group. Others came as guests of President of the House of Deputies Bonnie Anderson and church-affiliated groups such as the Chicago Consultation.Jenny Te Paa, dean of Te Rau Kahikatea (College of St. John the Evangelist) in Auckland, New Zealand, was invited by Anderson to serve as guest chaplain to the House of Deputies.Te Paa described the invitation as a “real honor,” and the experience as “mutually enriching all the way.”A delegation of Sudanese Episcopalians from the Diocese of Bor is attending at the invitation of their companion Diocese of Indianapolis, which is hosting the 77th General Convention.“It is important to help leaders from the other parts of the Anglican Communion to understand who we are as a church and how we come to decisions,” the Rev. Chuck Robertson, canon to the presiding bishop, told ENS. “But it’s also important for us to learn from them.”Mchombo said that, “despite our differences, there is a desire by many to continue to work together.” He was encouraged by the House of Bishops’ desire to continue the church’s financial support of the Anglican Communion Office’s operating budget, which had been reduced in draft budgets being considered at General Convention.The Rev. Paul Feheley, principal secretary to Archbishop Fred Hiltz of the Anglican Church of Canada, said that he sensed a mood of “helpful tension” at this General Convention, his third. “Instead of issues coming from the outside, there’s a tension within on structure and budget,” he said. “I’m hoping that tension might lead to creativity.”Basing a budget on the Five Marks of Mission is helpful, he said, because “it is something communion-wide that we can agree on.”Bishop Francisco Xico Silva of Southwestern Brazil said the Anglican Communion “is taking new steps towards strengthening companionships by focusing on horizontal rather than vertical relationships.” Of General Convention, he said that the international guests feel very welcomed and that it has been a “deep, spiritual experience.”Robertson, who has coordinated much of the international visitors program, upheld the work of the “shepherds,” who have “hosted the guests and been ambassadors for the Episcopal Church,” under the leadership of the Rev. Sam Smith from the Diocese of New York.About 30 ecumenical and inter-religious guests are at convention, representing the Islamic Society of North America, National Council of Churches USA, World Council of Churches, American Baptist Churches of Greater Indianapolis, American Jewish Committee, and the United Methodist Church.The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and the Moravian Church, two of the Episcopal Church’s full-communion partners, also sent leaders to represent their denominations at convention.Concelebrants at the July 5 Convention Eucharist were ELCA Presiding Bishop Mark Hanson and the Rev. Betsy Miller, president of the Provincial Elders’ Conference of Moravian Church Northern Province.“We have only begun to imagine the possibilities that come by virtue of our full-communion relationship,” said Hanson, speaking earlier in the week to the legislative committee on ecumenical relations.“Together, we can achieve things on a scale and scope we could never do otherwise,” he said, addressing Resolution A036 that gives thanks for the Episcopal-Lutheran full-communion relationship and asks that new mission and ministry opportunities be explored among the two churches.“In a culture that too often fears diversity, regarding it as cause for division and distrust and suspects unity to mean the demand for uniformity, we together have the opportunity to witness to God’s gift of unity within diversity,” Hanson added. “We are churches deeply rooted in Scripture, with our own theological traditions and distinctive histories, and we are always being made new.”The Rev. Margaret Rose, the Episcopal Church’s ecumenical and interreligious deputy, said that the presence of ecumenical and interreligious guests “helps us to see ourselves better.”More importantly, she added, “we are so aware that these guests are not just outsiders but they are also partners in the work of the common mission. Outside General Convention we work together on everything from conversations around doctrine, and common worship to engagement in common advocacy and common ecumenical projects.”At a dinner honoring the ecumenical and interreligious guests, Dr. Sayyid Syeed, director of interfaith and community alliances for the Islamic Society of North America, suggested to the presiding bishop that their two conventions should “get married.” He explained that the ISNA’s annual conference, which gathers 30 to 40 thousand Muslims for family workshops and celebrations, does not include much legislation. He suggested that the Episcopal Church might enjoy such a family gathering a little more and that the ISNA could learn something about legislation. Jefferts Schori repeated this story when the guests were introduced in the House of Bishops, Rose said.Another important reason to welcome the guests “is the realization that we are not alone in our various dealings,” said Rose. “Our Christian counterparts and one rabbi even said: ‘If I closed my eyes, I might not know this was an Episcopal gathering.’ We are all dealing with many of the same issues and it is good to share both the joys and the struggles.”The ecumenical, inter-religious and international visitors devoted one day to a field trip to experience the programs and local ministry of the Episcopal Diocese of Indianapolis. “We wanted to expose them to what our church is doing on the ground,” Robertson said.An orientation session was held on July 4 for all visitors to learn about the background and origins of General Convention, about the bicameral legislature of General Convention and the historical emphasis placed on the church being governed by the clergy and laity of one house, as well as bishops who sit in another.“It’s important to realize we’re members of a larger family, to renew relationships and to enjoy the diversity of the Episcopal Church,” said Anglican Church of Mexico Archbishop Carlos Touche-Porter, who is visiting General Convention for the fourth time as a bishop. “Being a family is about being in conversation, not about being in agreement.”Touche-Porter said that at past conventions he spent much of his time in the House of Bishops, but in Indianapolis he has found the opportunity to experience a broad diversity of the events that mark the church’s triennial gathering.Many of the guests said they were impressed with the size and structure of General Convention, whose legislative body is composed of about 845 deputies and more than 280 bishops.Touche-Porter said that he feels General Convention can be overloaded with resolutions. Almost 400 resolutions are being considered by the 77th General Convention in Indianapolis. By comparison, Touche-Porter said his own General Synod, as in all other Anglican Communion provinces, is a unicameral body in which bishops, clergy and laity sit together as one house. His synod is composed of 60 members and meets for two days every three years.Te Paa, discussing her role as House of Deputies chaplain, said the deputies realize how important it is to have a moment in their day when they “can simply be fed.” As a lay person, Te Paa told ENS that she feels that she offers “a very special diet” born out of her experience as a teacher, as a mother and grandmother, and as a lifelong woman of faith.She has been using the New Zealand prayer book to lead the house in prayer and offer a reflection each day. “I am trying to imagine a large family dinner and what the elder would say before the meal,” she said. “They’d just say something that is gathering, honoring and calming and appreciated. I’ve tried to use those principals. Certainly, I haven’t tried to be theologically sophisticated.”On one day she said that she talked about the omnipresence of God and “how important it is for us not simply to be sensing God, but looking toward God more intently in order that we might hear what God is saying to us.” She said she sees God everywhere in the House of Deputies and that there is a “tremendous yearning … amongst all of those present to get it right.”Te Paa said it’s extremely helpful for the guests to witness the bicameral polity at work.But for Te Paa, the highlight at convention is the liturgy. “No one does it as beautifully as the Episcopal Church,” she said, acknowledging the diversity of cultural and ethnic expressions that feed the church’s liturgical hunger. “You’ve just got the whole world going on here.”— Matthew Davies is an editor/reported of Episcopal News Service. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Anglican Communion, Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Job Listinglast_img read more

first_img Tags Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Africa, Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA [Anglican Communion News Service] The Most Rev. Daniel Sarfo, primate and metropolitan of the Church of the Province of West Africa (CPWA) and bishop of Kumasi in Ghana, has called on Christians around the world to dedicate one Sunday as a day of prayer for the deadly Ebola disease that has struck the west African region.In an interview with ACNS, Sarfo said: “We encourage Anglican churches world over to express solidarity by observing one Sunday as Ebola Sunday and to mobilize resources for the sub-region.”Anglicans can helpThe archbishop reiterated the important role that Anglicans in other countries can play in as far as mobilizing and bringing resources to the region. “Anglicans should challenge their governments to send resources, especially medical supplies to the affected areas,” he said.Recently, Archbishop Jonathan Bonaparte Hart of the Internal Province of West Africa in CPWA, of which the affected countries of Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea are a part, also raised up the need for material support when he said: “We need disposable surgical gloves, chlorine and basic hygiene kits to safeguard against Ebola.”Government actionGhana has not recorded any cases of the disease and Sarfo explained how the government there is trying to make sure the disease is prevented and does not cross borders.“In Ghana, a lot of education about the prevention of the disease is going on from the government through the Ministry of Health and church facilities of which the Anglican Church has quite a number,” he said. “The government has also provided equipment and materials through the Ministry of Health to the various health facilities while strict screening centers have been established at the airports and borders.”Church preventive measuresIn this challenging period, the Anglican Church in Ghana is still trying to live up to its social and prophetic role by introducing a number of preventive measures to help handle the threat posed by Ebola. As well as working with partner agencies to equip church health facilities, it is also providing guidance on how to pray for an end to this crisis, and those who have already been affected.Education is keySarfo said the church is encouraging clergy to use the pulpit to educate and sensitize their congregations about the disease. Clergy have also been told to postpone the traditional practice of having congregants share a common communion cup.“The communion can be received either by ‘intinction’, the practice of partly dipping the consecrated bread, or host, into the consecrated wine before consumption, or best by using individual small cups,” he said.Recently, the Most Rev. Nicholas Okoh, primate of the Anglican Church of Nigeria, also modified the administration of Holy Communion and suspended the shaking of hands during the exchange of the peace in his province, a measure aimed at preventing the spread of the disease.The World Health Organization reports that this year’s Ebola outbreak is one of the largest in history and the first in West Africa with approximately 2,220 reported cases and 1,226 deaths. It has affected four countries in West Africa including Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Health & Healthcare Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Press Release Service Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA West Africa archbishop urges Anglicans to pray for Ebola crisis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Events New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Cathedral Dean Boise, ID By Bellah ZuluPosted Aug 20, 2014 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Anglican Communion, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

first_img Theological Education Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing Posted Aug 27, 2014 Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET EDS names Battle as interim dean of students and community life An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Tags New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Bath, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release Cathedral Dean Boise, ID center_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA People, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 [Episcopal Divinity School press release] Episcopal Divinity School has announced the appointment of The Rev. Michael Battle, Ph.D., as Interim Dean of Students and Community Life for the 2014-15 academic year. Dr. Battle will begin working at EDS on Monday, August 25th, and will reside on the EDS campus in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Dr. Battle is an accomplished theologian and a respected pastoral leader whose ministry has spanned the globe. A graduate of Duke University (B.A. and Ph.D.), Princeton Theological Seminary (M.Div.), and Yale University (S.T.M.), he was ordained a priest in South Africa by Archbishop Desmond Tutu in 1993. His ministry focuses on Christian non-violence, human spirituality, and Black church studies. He is the author of several books, including Reconciliation: The Ubuntu Theology of Desmond Tutu and Blessed are the Peacemakers: A Christian Spirituality of Non-violence.Dr. Battle is founder of the PeaceBattle Institute and has served as Rector and Canon Theologian in the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles. Previously, he served as Provost of the Cathedral Center, Vice President, Associate Dean of Academic Studies and Associate Professor of Theology at Virginia Theological Seminary in Alexandria, Virginia.He has also served as Chaplain to the Episcopal House of Bishops, as a member of the Theology Committee of the Episcopal Church, as Spiritual Director of CREDO, Wellness Conference of the Episcopal Church, and on several boards, including EDS alumna Mpho Tutu’s Institute for Prayer and Pilgrimage.Most recently, Dr. Battle served as Vicar of St. Titus Episcopal Church in Durham, North Carolina. His website is michaelbattle.com.About Episcopal Divinity SchoolEpiscopal Divinity School (EDS) is a progressive center for study and spiritual formation for lay and ordained leaders. Committed to a mission of social justice and inclusive education and grounded in the Anglican tradition, EDS awards Masters degrees in Divinity and Theological Studies, Doctoral degrees in Ministry, and Certificates in Anglican Formation; Justice, Reconciliation, and Mission; and Christian Spiritualities for the Contemporary World.EDS is a member of the Boston Theological Institute, a consortium of 10 eminent theological schools, seminaries, and departments of religion in the Boston area.A seminary for the Episcopal Church, Episcopal Divinity School is grounded in the Anglican tradition and committed to growing in relationship with other Christian and faith traditions. Episcopal Divinity School is an academic community of biblical, historical, and theological inquiry that respects students as responsible learners with valuable experience, supports spiritual and ministerial formation, and provides tools for the life-long work of social and personal transformation. To learn more about EDS, visit www.eds.edu. Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MIlast_img read more

first_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Western New York Episcopalians donate to breast cancer research Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Health & Healthcare The youth of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Orchard Park and St. Martin’s Episcopal Church in Grand Island were soggy but triumphant after placing 3,825 flags in lawn of Western New York’s Diocesan Ministry Center. The skies opened up about halfway through the time it took to complete the job. Photo: Diocese of Western New York[Episcopal Diocese of Western New York] On Oct. 17, the Right Rev. R. William Franklin, bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Western New York, presented a check for $6,375 to Roswell Park Cancer Institute to be used for breast cancer research. The check is the result of the Pink Flag Campaign held for the diocese’s Health Awareness Week, October 12-18.The Rev. Cathy Dempesy-Sims, who serves the Church of the Good Shepherd and the Church of the Ascension in Buffalo, accompanied the bishop for the check presentation. Dempesy-Sims is a breast cancer survivor who was successfully treated at Roswell Park in 2010.“It’s fitting that this donation from our first diocesan-wide Health Awareness Week is going to support breast cancer research at Roswell Park,” said Bishop Franklin. “This world-class cancer center was founded by Dr. Roswell Park, whose father was an Episcopal priest in the Diocese of Chicago. After Moving to Buffalo, Dr. Roswell Park was a member of the Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd in Buffalo where the Rev. Cathy Dempesy-Sims is now the priest.”The Pink Flag campaign was coordinated by the diocese. For every $5.00 a member of the diocese donated to the campaign, that member’s church received three bright pink lawn flags for the church’s front lawn. For every flag placed on every church lawn across the diocese, one was also placed on the lawn of the Diocesan Ministry Center at 1064 Brighton Road in Tonawanda.The campaign resulted in a total of nearly 8,000 pink flags on Episcopal properties across Western New York, 3,825 of them on the Diocesan Ministry Center’s front lawn thanks to the youth of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Orchard Park and St. Martin’s Episcopal Church, Grand Island.Health Awareness Week is anchored by the Feast of St. Luke, on October 18th. St. Luke is the patron saint of physicians and surgeons.Next year, the diocese will focus its attention and support on a different health issue. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release Posted Oct 20, 2014 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Belleville, IL last_img read more

first_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Congolese refugees Jeanine Balezi, an intensive-case manager for Refugee Focus, left, and Namughisha Nashimwe, pose for a photo in Nashimwe’s apartment in Tucson. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENS[Episcopal News Service – Tucson, Arizona] Peace and security that let them close their eyes and sleep at night; the ability to work and provide for their families: These are the things that female refugees – most of them single mothers – say changed most dramatically in their lives after they were resettled in Tucson.“I’m really doing much better here. There’s food on the table. The kids are in school. I have clean water, milk and, most of all, peace,” said Murorunkwere Zaburiya, 58. “I can sleep in quiet.”A Congolese refugee, Zaburiya arrived in Tucson seven months ago with five children, aged 10 to 26, after spending 18 years in a refugee camp in Rwanda.Illiterate and not speaking a word of English, she became a member of a women’s empowerment group operated by Refugee Focus, which receives support from Episcopal Migration Ministries through funding from the United States government’s Office of Refugee Resettlement.Today, Zaburiya has learned the skills necessary to hold a job. Through English as a Second Language courses, she is beginning to recognize English words. And her children are receiving an education.Women learn basic math skills during a morning training workshop at Refugee Focus’s office in downtown Tucson. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSThrough Episcopal Migration Ministries, the Episcopal Church partners with 30 resettlement affiliates in 26 dioceses nationwide. It is one of nine agencies working in partnership with the U.S. Department of State to welcome and resettle refugees to the United States.“Episcopal Migration Ministries is part of this really wonderful, humanitarian program that allows some of the most vulnerable people in the world to start rebuilding their lives,” said Nicolle Trudeau, Refugee Focus’s director, during an interview with Episcopal News Service in her downtown Tucson office. About half of the 300 refugees served annually by Refugee Focus come through Episcopal Migration Ministries.In 2014, the Episcopal Church and its partners worked to resettle 5,155 of the tens of thousands of refugees who came to the United States through the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees’ (UNHCR) screening process. They’ll work to serve as many people this year as the United States plans to resettle 70,000 refugees — half of the 1 percent of the 15.5 million refugees worldwide who’ll be resettled this year.Many of those refugees will come from the Democratic Republic of Congo.Since 1998, more than 5.5 million people have died in the Congo from fighting, disease and malnutrition; 2.5 million people have been internally displaced; and some 500,000 have fled the country’s protracted conflict, with the vast majority living in refugee camps in the Great Lakes and Horn of Africa regions.Over the next several years, UNHCR plans to resettle 50,000 refugees from the Congo, with 70 to 90 percent to be resettled to the United States, said Kurt Bonz, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ program manager, during a recent webinar hosted by the Episcopal Church aimed at educating the faith community about the situation in the Congo and how to support and advocate for Congolese refugees.“Most of the refugees have been in camps an average of 20 years, education is low, and many are single women with children who continue to experience trauma related to living in the Congo, the journey out and living in a refugee camp,” he said.Ongoing armed conflict has been particularly brutal in the Congo; the number of Congolese women-at-risk is double that found in other refugee populations. This has led to studies aimed at identifying particular risks, challenges and strengths and developing strategies for policymakers and service providers to better serve the women and their families.A refugee is someone who has fled their country of nationality and its protection because of a “well-founded fear of persecution” based on race, religion, ethnicity, political or social affiliation. Among female refugees considered “women-at-risk,” most have endured rape and other forms of gender-related sexual violence, with many giving birth to children conceived as a result of rape.Upon arriving in the United States, refugees receive three months of case management and financial support to help them adjust, plus additional support to help them find employment and reach financial self-sufficiency. The formula works for some but not all refugees. Programs funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services provides additional money for resettlement agencies to assist refugees with special challenges – in this case, single women with children.Of the 50,000 Congolese refugees selected for resettlement, the U.S. is expected to resettle 80 percent. Of those, at least 20 percent are expected to be women-at-risk and eligible for intensive case management.Recognizing the need, in 2013, with an $8,000 grant from a nondenominational church, Refugee Focus created its own program aimed at empowering at-risk women. Last year, the program continued with the support from Episcopal Migration Ministries, said Trudeau.Given the elevated rates of violence and trauma endured by Congolese women and their children, it was crucial that this population have the opportunity to be resettled in the United States and have access to a supportive community environment where women could connect with each other to rebuild their support systems, said Trudeau.Refugee Focus’ women’s empowerment program began with a question to the women: What can we do to better serve you? The women responded with, “We do everything as a group; we want to receive services as a group.”The empowerment program’s goals were to create a social network for refugee women, strengthen employable skills through improved English proficiency, encourage economic independence, and promote personal development and financial skills.Through private grants, the women were paid between $300 and $400 in small increments for their participation in the program: attending trainings, attending ESL classes, participating in community events. It counted toward payment if they arrived on time, and their payments were docked if they didn’t.“It turned out to be a wonderful training tool for people who’d never had a job,” said Trudeau. “It gave them a sense of control to earn the money to pay the bills.”The program started with 22 women. In six months, 20 had found employment. “We were so successful, we ran out of people,” she said.More than its measurable factors, the empowerment program provides a lifeline to women who otherwise would be navigating a new way of being, a new country and an unfamiliar city on their own.Namughisha Nashimwe, 41, arrived in Tucson in December 2013, after four years in a refugee camp, with her five children, now aged 5 to 20. Initially, a counselor told her first to take time to recover from her trauma and that, rather than attend school, her eldest son should get a job and support the family.Nashimwe’s peers in the empowerment group and Refugee Focus staff, however, had other advice: They told her that she was capable of working and of providing for her family.“The women helped me a lot. I was motivated by the group,” she said, speaking in Kinyarwanda – the official language of Rwanda – interpreted by Jeanine Balezi, an intensive-case manager for Refugee Focus. “Some people will tell you, you don’t have to go to work. But in talking to others in the group and with Jeanine, I decided I’m going to get a job to help my family to have a better life,” she said during an interview with ENS in her apartment, a 10-15 minute drive from downtown Tucson.Nashimwe works part time as a janitor in a school. Her son is a high school student and recently started a job working weekends at a carwash.“Had she not had a group, she would have been in crisis,” said Trudeau. You cannot make progress when stuck in a crisis mode, and Refugee Focus doesn’t have the money to assist clients in crisis, only to help them toward self-sufficiency, she added.“It is not an easy process, people do come with very real barriers,” Trudeau said, adding that there’s a limit to where funds can take them. “The strength that they used to survive for so many years has to be drawn on here. There’s no safety net for the long term.”Investing in refugees, she continued, is more than just initial resettlement; it’s about developing plans and support that individuals and families can depend on over the many years they struggle to overcome the barriers associated with poverty in the United States.In some ways, the women say, resettlement is like winning the lottery. Still, when a refugee arrives in the United States, the thrill of beginning a new life also brings increased anxiety, isolation and a loss of family and community.“You feel like you are lost and empty, you can’t communicate,” said Balezi, 41, who spent two years in a Congolese refugee camp in Cameroon before coming to Tucson in 2000 with her infant son. He now is 15 and attends high school.Balezi attended a university in the Congo and, besides being fluent in French, speaks at least seven other regional languages. But when she arrived in Tucson, she said, she spoke no English, not even a “hi.”In more than one way, she’s a role model.Through Balezi’s interactions with the women, the love and respect they have for her is obvious. They laugh and joke easily in her presence. But it’s also clear she pushes them to leave their comfort zones – to learn a new bus route or apply for a job – and that they appreciate it.Once a refugee arrives in the United States, things move quickly. From the airport, refugees are driven to their furnished apartment, where staff and volunteers teach them how to operate appliances like the stove and television, the kitchen sink and the shower.The food pantry is stocked, and a culturally appropriate meal – typically rice and beans and chicken, in the case of Congolese refugees – has been prepared for the family.The next day, they’re registered for food stamps. Within a week they’ve applied for a Social Security card. By day 10, the children are enrolled in school.Refugee Focus is working with local partners to landscape this outdoor space for hosting events and so teenagers have a place to hang out. Photo: Refugee FocusRefugee Focus operates on a $1.6 million annual budget with 16 full-time and 10 on-call employees and two full-time AmeriCorps VISTA volunteers. In addition to federal funds, Refugee Focus relies on support from donors, local partners and community volunteers to fund and carry out its programs.Given the Episcopal Church’s role in refugee resettlement, General Convention in 2012 passed legislation calling for the modernization of the nation’s refugee resettlement program to meet the needs of a diverse population.“One of the greatest strengths of the refugee resettlement program is public-private partnership, with private funds and donations complementing federally funded services and support,” said Katherine Conway, immigration and refugee policy analyst for The Episcopal Church Office of Government Relations based in Washington, D.C. “Each day the Missionary Society and volunteers engage in the ministry of welcome, but private contributions must be matched by robustly funded services. A volunteer can help to furnish a refugee family’s apartment or provide a winter coat, but he/she cannot counsel a survivor of torture or provide recertification services.”Episcopalians can advocate for refugees by joining the Episcopal Public Policy Network.Tucson, a city with a population of just over half a million people, is served by three refugee-resettlement agencies and becomes home to 1,000 new refugees annually. Work-eligible refugees often fill vacancies in low-wage, unskilled jobs in the servicing industry, washing dishes in restaurants and cleaning hotel rooms; working largely unseen.Refugee Focus’s resettlement work has largely gone unseen, as well. And then, about a year ago, Trudeau moved its offices from a strip mall outside the city’s core to a few blocks from the city’s main bus terminal downtown.Imago Dei Middle School’s student body includes 12 refugees, 11 of them referred through Refugee Focus. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSThe new location has provided visibility both for Refugee Focus and its clients, who often take the bus and then walk to the office on North Stone Avenue across from the main branch of the Pima County Library. It’s also around the corner from Imago Dei Middle School, which provides holistic education aimed at breaking the cycles of poverty to 70 students grades five through eight.Trudeau has developed a strong partnership with the Rev. Anne Sawyer, an Episcopal priest and co-founder and head of the school. The two met through Rotary Club when Trudeau was looking for office space downtown. Later, Trudeau visited the school and began to identify refugee children who would benefit from the school’s intensive, six-day week, 11-month school year, which allows students who may not be at grade level the time and personal attention to catch up.“It’s not unusual for our fifth-grade scholars to come to us at a second- or third-grade level, and, if they are bilingual, they may be at a kindergarten or first-grade level,” said Sawyer.The student body now includes 12 refugees, 11 of them referred through Refugee Focus, said Sawyer.“We see behaviors that indicate life was difficult,” said Sawyer. Refugee students have lost their countries, grown up in refugee camps, sometimes have lost parents and have experienced or witnessed traumas, she said. “At young ages, they have experienced a lot, but that is not [un]like some of our other students who have experienced poverty, as well.”The African students, originally from the Congo, Rwanda, Uganda, Malawi or South Africa, say they plan to study medicine, engineering and other professions, and that small class sizes, individual attention and shared language contribute to a comfortable, supportive educational environment.“When I first came here it felt different,” said Emeline, a student originally from the Congo. “I felt like it was my home. We all started speaking Swahili.”Drumming helps trauma survivors to heal and reconnect. Photo: Refugee FocusAnother way in which Refugee Focus has fostered community is through hosting events in partnership with Richard Noell, who uses drumming as a way to help trauma survivors regain confidence and express themselves.Music and drumming help the women reconnect with joy, and it opens them to healing, said Noell.The staff and volunteers who have worked with at-risk women have been “blown away by the amount of strength and perseverance that these women have come with,” said Trudeau.“It’s that difference: When you see a description of someone on paper, a single mother who is maybe a rape victim who has five children and may be pregnant again, coming to the U.S. – How is she going to survive? How is she going to support herself? Her family? And yet we see it happen every day,” said Trudeau.“They come here, and within months they are learning a new language and making sure that their children get to school every day, making sure that they are bathed, and taken care of and fed, and riding a bus for two hours to take an English class and then working a part-time job, perhaps, and learning how to balance those finances, and it doesn’t happen without a system of tight support and services,” she said.“But in large part it’s happening by the strength of the clients we serve, and I think it just goes to show that what somebody is on paper doesn’t really define who they are.”— Lynette Wilson is an Episcopal News Service editor and reporter. Immigration, Rector Tampa, FL Refugee women, children rebuild lives in Arizona In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET W. Gaye Brown says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Comments (1) Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Hopkinsville, KY Refugees Migration & Resettlement Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME center_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Africa, Comments are closed. Submit a Press Release Tags March 2, 2015 at 6:38 pm Great to see that refugee resettlement is still going well in Tucson. As director of Episcopal Community Services in Arizona for ten years in the 1980s, I was privileged to work with a wonderful group of staff and volunteers who successfully resettled refugees from areas of conflict throughout the world. I was often amazed by the ability of so many refugees to overcome all sorts of obstacles and build a new and productive life in this country. Keep up the good work; it is needed now more than ever! Anglican Communion, Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY Press Release Service Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Advocacy Peace & Justice, An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 By Lynette WilsonPosted Mar 2, 2015 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs last_img read more