first_imgStock image.NEW YORK — Attorney General Letitia James has issued a warning about new, recently reported scams using New Yorkers’ personal information to file fraudulent claims for unemployment benefits.“We must remain vigilant about potential scams and ensure residents remain alert,” James said. “During these uncertain times, unemployment benefits are a safety net for many individuals and families who have lost their jobs. To exploit the use of these funds and overload a system that is already processing unprecedented numbers of claims per day is as shameful as it is illegal. My office remains committed to holding accountable anyone who violates the law, and I continue to encourage the public to report suspected scams to my office.”State officials have received recent reports of scammers having access to detailed databases with Personally Identifiable Information (P.I.I.). Armed with P.I.I., scammers have sought out cooperation from “mules” who are used as intermediaries for filing claims online seeking benefits, exploiting the avalanche of legitimate claims that have hit the New York State Department of Labor due to the COVID-19 crisis.Individuals who have been contacted by the NYS Department of Labor about unemployment benefits they did not apply for must be aware of the possibility of identity theft. Attorney General James highlights the following tips for New Yorkers to protect themselves from these scams:Be suspicious of anyone who calls you over the phone seeking money or personal information. If you owe money, you will receive a legitimate notice in writing that identifies the agency and the reason you owe money.Do not give out personal and sensitive information, including your Social Security number and bank account information, to individuals over the phone. In addition, ensure to independently verify the authenticity of the caller.Victims of unemployment benefits fraud should report any incidents to their employer and to the NYS Department of Labor Unemployment Insurance Program. Victims can also file a complaint online with the Office of the Attorney General or call 1-800-771-7755.Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_img More funerals are planned this week – three today, two on Tuesday. Another had yet to be scheduled. The lone survivor of the mine remain hospitalized and had yet to wake up Sunday afternoon after several days of heavy sedation. Near the mine, which has been sealed off by federal and state regulators, more than 100 people gathered Sunday morning at the Sago Baptist Church, the building where they kept vigil for more than 40 hours after the explosion last Monday. Churchgoers sang hymns, including “The Sweet Bye and Bye” and “Farther Along,” which speak of accepting God’s unfathomable plan, and the Rev. Wease Day urged worshippers not to look for someone to blame. Instead, Day said, worshippers should imagine they had only 10 hours to live, and write a note about how they would spend those final hours. The surviving miner, 26-year-old Randal McCloy Jr., was hospitalized in Morgantown. He had been in a medically induced coma to allow his brain time to heal, and while hospital officials said in a statement Sunday that his sedation had been stopped, they said it would take awhile for the medication to clear his system. “It has been very difficult to allow him to awaken, although that is our hope today,” said Dr. Larry Roberts, the head of McCloy’s treatment team at West Virginia University’s Ruby Memorial Hospital. Once that happens, they can begin neurological testing to determine the extent of the damage McCloy suffered in the mine. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! PHILIPPI, W.Va. – The funerals began early. There were just so many in West Virginia coal mining towns this Sunday. And after the agonizing heartbreak that played out on television as families learned that 12 miners they thought were alive in the Sago Mine had actually died, the funerals were, for the most part, a private affair. The miners’ relatives and their tight-knit communities filled the services, while police created a protective ring around funeral homes, asking the media not to intrude. Even from a distance, the pain was clear as nearly 100 mourners hugged one another, many staring at their feet as they walked inside to remember Jackie Weaver, a 52-year-old electrician who had spent 26 years working in the mines. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECoach Doc Rivers a “fan” from way back of Jazz’s Jordan Clarkson There were so many funerals it was occasionally difficult for the funeral home employees to remember the times and locations without checking. Wright Funeral Home worker Pete Sandridge’s eyes filled with tears when he was asked if he knew any of the miners personally. All he could manage was to hold up four fingers, then walked away. First was Martin Toler Jr., whose funeral was held Sunday morning in Tesla. Next was Weaver’s service in Philippi at 1 p.m. Services for David Lewis, Jesse Jones and Alva Bennett were an hour later, in Philippi and Buckhannon. Jerry Groves’ memorial service was later in Cleveland. “I know I’ll see him again,” said Groves’ wife of nearly 29 years, Debbie, speaking during the memorial service. “Eternity is forever. Our time here is just a vapor.” last_img read more