first_imgFour political science professors will share the Washington Hall stage April 12 to exchange and debate their opinions about the intersection of Catholicism and politics. HolyVotes, an event seeking to open a pathway for political discussion on campus, will replace the God Debate, held in past years. Senior Malcolm Phelan described HolyVotes as a “lighthearted and rational political debate” that needs to take place at Notre Dame in order to counter the political dialogue currently dominating the media. “Most news outlets and political commentators seem to be acting out some form of grotesque tragedy about the death of reason and discourse,” Phelan said. “That’s exactly why we are hosting HolyVotes. We want to lay out our civic beliefs as Catholics, and then discuss which form of government best helps us to achieve those goals.” HolyVotes will feature professors Sebastian Rosato, Eric Sims, Vincent Munoz and Michael Desch. Junior Arnav Dutt, a coordinator for the event, said he was grateful for the faculty members’ willingness to voice their opinions outside of the classroom. “In a way, these professors chose themselves,” Dutt said. “All three were brave enough to tackle the issue in a public forum.” Rosato, a professor of political science specializing in international relations, said he will represent the Democratic position, which is often considered more controversial because of the Catholic tendency to vote Republican. “It’s a very complex issue, one that many people view as black and white,” Rosato said. “The assumption is if you vote Republican, you are going straight to the pro-life argument, and if you’re Democrat, you are going to run straight to the social justice issues. “I think there is a lot of overlap, and I think that the parties are internally divided, and that therefore, this is a debate that really needs to occur on campus.” Rosato said defending the Democratic stances on abortion and gay marriage represents the most difficult task, but he believes his arguments can counter the opposition if received with an open mind. “In these types of debates, people typically tend to give the party line or the Catholic stance, and there is no one on the other end,” Rosato said. “I think the other professors involved in this debate are well-intentioned, and I believe most people in the room will be able to treat it as a debate, but I fear it may devolve into name calling.” Despite advice not to participate in HolyVotes, Rosato said he believes it is his duty to ask the charged questions and contribute to overturning the paradigm of asserting truths rather than debating issues. “I believe I was put on this earth to make arguments and to make them regardless of what people thought,” Rosato said. “As a privileged professor at Notre Dame, I’m meant to inform and contribute to raising the level of discourse. My job is to think, and that’s why I said yes.” Dutt said the event is meant to encourage contemplation and dialogue. “Students should expect an intellectually stimulating debate conducted at a high volume,” he said. Phelan agreed HolyVotes should make attendees think. “My hope is that we all stumble out of Washington Hall, slightly dazed at the brilliance of Rosato, Munoz, Sims and Desch while considering what duties we owe our country and our fellow citizens.”last_img read more

first_imgA small group of Syracuse players looked at one another, deciding who would be the spokesman for the latest historic event in a long line of them for the Syracuse men’s lacrosse program.The Orange had just captured the 800th victory in program history, a feat only duplicated by Johns Hopkins — a school that currently sits at 896 wins. Finally, the oldest at the podium took the microphone. SU’s crew of juniors at the table — Jovan Miller, Josh Amidon and Stephen Keogh — deferred to senior Max Bartig.‘Eight-hundred wins for any team is a huge feat,’ Bartig said. ‘That can go toward Coach Desko, toward the players, toward the coaches in the past. It’s just a number. Like Jovan (Miller) was saying, it’s all about the team for us.’Most of the players said they weren’t aware of the impending mark before the game. For SU head coach John Desko, though, it was a different story.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textDesko has been with the Orange as a player, assistant coach and head coach for more than 405 of the team’s 800 wins. And he took time after the game to revel in the accomplishment of his program.‘To be part of that tradition as an assistant coach and as a head coach, and to see it all, it’s important,’ Desko said. ‘ … To have this consistency and to be part of so many national championships and final fours and other championship games, I just feel I have a great appreciation of where it is and where it’s been. To be part of it is very important to me.’Faceoffs from the other sideSyracuse’s faceoff specialists haven’t been kind to their opponents so far this season. Jeremy Thompson and Gavin Jenkinson have each used different techniques to get the Orange possession and win the faceoff battle consistently. Thompson and Jenkinson have dominated in the X and have been most of the reason SU has gained possession on 59.1 percent of the draws so far this season. On Saturday, Albany’s Matt Mackenzie welcomed the challenge. He didn’t win the faceoff battle, but he had the most faceoff wins of any individual the Orange has faced so far this season. After the game, Mackenzie said the key to his success on the day started with his positive mindset going into each faceoff.‘I needed to go in there regardless of who I’m facing, whether it was Thompson or it was (Jenkinson),’ Mackenzie said. ‘You just need to go in there and have that mindset of, ‘You know what, I’m going to get this ball.’ I felt that I did a good job.’Before Saturday, the most faceoff wins an individual opponent had against came from Virginia’s Ryan Benincasa on March 7, when he had 10 wins on the draw in SU’s only loss of the season. And Mackenzie knew he would have to have similar success to give the Great Danes a chance. ‘Jeremy Thompson has like, five or six goals in under six seconds (this season),’ Mackenzie said. ‘I went into the game thinking I had to cut down on the fast break. I can’t let that happen, and I thought I did a pretty good job of tying them up.’Learning from last year  When Albany came to the Dome last season, Syracuse seemed to have a stranglehold on the game by halftime. The Orange took a 10-2 lead over the Great Danes into the break. But in the third, Albany came roaring back. The Great Danes outscored SU 8-1 in that quarter to pull within one goal.  Although the Orange did pull out the 15-13 win a year ago, head coach John Desko made sure his players did not forget about that game when they took a 9-3 lead into the break Saturday.  ‘In between the periods it was all about talking about what could happen and making sure that we valued our possessions and that we stayed out of the penalty box and didn’t make mental errors,’ Desko said.  Albany did score the first goal in the third quarter, but Bartig and senior attack Chris Daniello quickly abolished the Great Danes’ comeback hopes.  Just 12 seconds into a man-up opportunity, Daniello hit Bartig on the left side of the goal, and he fired a shot perfectly into the top corner of the cage. Two minutes later, Daniello breezed by Albany defenseman Brendan Gleason on a restart and scored from just outside the crease to extend the Orange lead to 11-4.  Albany head coach Scott Marr said his team had an opportunity to go on a run with the performance of faceoff man Matt Mackenzie. But unlike last year, it never materialized.  ‘We pieced a couple (goals) in there again, but they sprinkled some in so we never really could close the gap,’ Marr said. ‘In years past, we’ve gone on five-, six-, seven-goal runs, and unfortunately today, we didn’t have that same run.’ bplogiur@syr.edu zjbrown@syr.edu Published on April 5, 2010 at 12:00 pm Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Commentslast_img read more