first_imgFour political science professors will share the Washington Hall stage April 12 to exchange and debate their opinions about the intersection of Catholicism and politics. HolyVotes, an event seeking to open a pathway for political discussion on campus, will replace the God Debate, held in past years. Senior Malcolm Phelan described HolyVotes as a “lighthearted and rational political debate” that needs to take place at Notre Dame in order to counter the political dialogue currently dominating the media. “Most news outlets and political commentators seem to be acting out some form of grotesque tragedy about the death of reason and discourse,” Phelan said. “That’s exactly why we are hosting HolyVotes. We want to lay out our civic beliefs as Catholics, and then discuss which form of government best helps us to achieve those goals.” HolyVotes will feature professors Sebastian Rosato, Eric Sims, Vincent Munoz and Michael Desch. Junior Arnav Dutt, a coordinator for the event, said he was grateful for the faculty members’ willingness to voice their opinions outside of the classroom. “In a way, these professors chose themselves,” Dutt said. “All three were brave enough to tackle the issue in a public forum.” Rosato, a professor of political science specializing in international relations, said he will represent the Democratic position, which is often considered more controversial because of the Catholic tendency to vote Republican. “It’s a very complex issue, one that many people view as black and white,” Rosato said. “The assumption is if you vote Republican, you are going straight to the pro-life argument, and if you’re Democrat, you are going to run straight to the social justice issues. “I think there is a lot of overlap, and I think that the parties are internally divided, and that therefore, this is a debate that really needs to occur on campus.” Rosato said defending the Democratic stances on abortion and gay marriage represents the most difficult task, but he believes his arguments can counter the opposition if received with an open mind. “In these types of debates, people typically tend to give the party line or the Catholic stance, and there is no one on the other end,” Rosato said. “I think the other professors involved in this debate are well-intentioned, and I believe most people in the room will be able to treat it as a debate, but I fear it may devolve into name calling.” Despite advice not to participate in HolyVotes, Rosato said he believes it is his duty to ask the charged questions and contribute to overturning the paradigm of asserting truths rather than debating issues. “I believe I was put on this earth to make arguments and to make them regardless of what people thought,” Rosato said. “As a privileged professor at Notre Dame, I’m meant to inform and contribute to raising the level of discourse. My job is to think, and that’s why I said yes.” Dutt said the event is meant to encourage contemplation and dialogue. “Students should expect an intellectually stimulating debate conducted at a high volume,” he said. Phelan agreed HolyVotes should make attendees think. “My hope is that we all stumble out of Washington Hall, slightly dazed at the brilliance of Rosato, Munoz, Sims and Desch while considering what duties we owe our country and our fellow citizens.”last_img read more

first_img Press Association Rule 6-3a states that if a player arrives at his starting point, within five minutes after his starting time, he is given a two-shot penalty. Otherwise, the penalty for a breach of the rule is disqualification. The story took another twist when it later emerged that Jeppe Huldahl was about to tee off in Granberg’s place, only to be told that he was only first reserve if a European Tour member pulled out. As Granberg is an Asian Tour member, his place should have gone to first reserve Anthony Kang, but Kang had given up hope of getting a place and withdrawn to caddie for his friend Uhno Park instead. That meant Singapore’s Chih-Bing Lam, who was originally second reserve, took up the place and had to sprint to the 11th tee, where he joined Park’s group and proceeded to shoot a four-under-par 66 to lie joint third. Lam told European Tour Radio: “We were sitting having lunch and I was nudging Anthony to go and caddie because we just didn’t think we had a chance. You couldn’t script it any better and to get paired together, that was just hilarious. “When I got the call to go to the 11th tee I was just waiting for Anthony to be on the other end and say ‘Gotcha’ but somehow it worked out pretty well today.” Kang added: “I felt really bad for Joonas being in that situation and felt bad for me not getting a spot, but I’m glad Chih-Bing got a spot and played a fantastic round today.” Sweden’s Joel Sjoholm almost got disqualified as well, arriving on the first tee with moments to spare and having to play the first hole without his golf shoes. “I set six alarm clocks this morning and woke up in desperation at 7:58am, tee time was 8:30am and we live a good 25 minutes from here so I was panicking to the tee box,” Sjoholm told European Tour Radio. “I was lucky to get a taxi pretty quickly and the European Tour helped me out big time because I showed up without any golf shoes on because they were in the locker. They went to the locker for me and I played the first hole in sneakers until I came up to the green when they were standing nicely there with two pairs of shoes so I could pick. It was the royal treatment! “It felt quite awkward and when I was standing over the first tee shot I realised I hadn’t even tied the laces on my sneakers, which are a half size too big as well. “I managed to scramble a four on the first; the whole day I have just been waiting to make a bogey and it happened on the last hole. I am happy I shot minus two, I should not even be here. I am really happy at the moment. Maybe I should do it more often because it’s a long time since I started that good.” Sjoholm’s round of 68 left him four behind Higgins, who carded nine birdies and three bogeys in his six-under-par 64 to finish one ahead of Italy’s Andrea Pavan. Higgins, who lost his European Tour card by less than 20,000 euros at the end of the season, said: “It was great. I just played good solid golf from tee to green, holed some lovely putts and had a chip in; if you’re going to shoot a low score like that you’ve got to do some good stuff. “If you drive it well here you’ve got a lot of short irons into the greens and that’s a strong part of my game so I’m comfortable on that. It has quite a linksy feel with the firm conditions and I grew up on Waterville, one of the best courses in Ireland, so that suits me. “I played quite well towards the end of the season so I have been coming into some form, been working hard and it’s time to push on and have a good week here.” Pavan dropped just one shot, at his penultimate hole, in his 65, with English duo Adam Gee and Seve Benson among a seven-strong group a shot further back on four under. Defending champion Miguel Angel Jimenez, seeking a record-equalling fourth win in the event, three-putted the last and had to settle for a level-par 70. Granberg was due to tee off at 11:50am local time from the 11th hole at Hong Kong Golf Club, but initially went to the first tee before realising his mistake. The 26-year-old then dashed to the 11th tee only to find his caddie had gone to the 10th tee – the more usual starting place for a two-tee start – instead. Ireland’s David Higgins claimed a one-shot lead after the first round of the Hong Kong Open that saw Finland’s Joonas Granberg suffer a bizarre disqualification and massive confusion over his replacement.last_img read more