first_imgThe Saint Mary’s Women’s Choir and the Saint Mary’s Collegiate Choirs will perform their fall concert with Bellacapella on Wednesday in O’Laughlin Auditorium.Conductor Nancy Menk said the Women’s Choir will be singing the same songs they plan to take to the American Choral Directors Association Conference in Chicago this coming February.“One of our pieces, a setting of Psalm 150, is composed by Carolyn Pirtle, assistant director for the Center for Liturgy at Notre Dame, so we have a local composer represented,” Menk said. “Another piece I’m proud of is ‘Heaven Full of Stars’ by Eric William Barnum. It’s a very challenging piece for advanced women’s choirs, and I feel we’re singing it very well.”Sophomore Alyssa Rogers said the challenging music has been exciting to learn.“The music we have been working on is very diverse,” she said. “Some pieces are slow and traditional, but we also have a few that are new and upbeat. Several of the pieces are sung a cappella, and others have very complex piano accompaniment. We are also singing a few pieces in different languages.”Rogers said the concert will showcase the progress and hard work of both choirs.Junior Jackie Schramm said the fall concert is particularly exciting because it is the first time the campus can hear both choirs together. Schramm said she enjoys being in a choir because she can express herself with like-minded people.“Choral music, in my opinion, is a rare opportunity to hear a larger group of people work together to make a uniform sound with just their voices. This skill is not as easy as it seems” Schramm said.Rogers said she has always enjoyed performing arts.“I really enjoy being able to go to choir after all my classes and do something totally different. It’s very relaxing and rewarding for me,” she said. “Most forms of entertainment today are experienced through various forms of media. I think that it is important to appreciate choral music in live performances as well because it is a totally different experience. It’s not always perfect, but it’s real, and that’s what makes it so enjoyable for me.”Menk said participation in choirs has positive effects on students.“There is study after study about how participating in choirs boosts students’ academic abilities and social interactions. It’s a great way to de-stress from homework and exams as well,” Menk said.Tags: bellacappella, chorale, collegiate choir, fall concert, SMC women’s choir, Women’s Choirlast_img read more

first_img Soldiers also make recommendations for items they would like to see in Meals, Ready-to-Eat, known as MREs. But sometimes, implementing these items is not feasible due to the process of food preservation technology. Kennedy said this is the case with a commonly recommended item, pizza. Entrees prepared using these methods will taste as though freshly prepared, Kennedy said. “The rations are never good enough,” Kennedy said. “We’re always looking to improve them and to be in alignment with what the current warfighter wants and also meeting nutritional needs.” MREs are produced through the “retort process,” which is a thermal processing method meant to sterilize food. The food items are sealed into a pouch and heated under pressure to temperatures above 240 degrees. This inactivates the microbes that would cause food spoilage. Each year, the Combat Feeding Directorate goes into the field to test new food items with the warfighters and gets input on existing food items, said Jeanette Kennedy, a senior food technologist at Natick Labs, Massachusetts. By Dialogo August 05, 2013 She said they are currently testing around six new flavors for the First Strike Ration’s pocket sandwiches. Kennedy said Natick Soldier Research is currently researching non-thermal, low-thermal, and advanced thermal processes that are less detrimental to the food as compared to the retort process. For next year’s production, Combat Feeding Directorate will also transition to foldable fiberboard sleeves instead of the current cartons inside the MREs to greatly reduce the size and weight, Kennedy said. center_img Barbecue shredded beef, vegetarian taco pasta, and seasoned black beans will replace chicken fajitas, vegetable lasagna, refried beans and potato cheddar soup in the 2014 production of Meals, Ready-to-Eat. Currently, there are 24 menus, which consist of an entrée, such as beef stew or lemon pepper tuna, and several other food items, such as crackers with cheese spread, fruit, and pound cake. Since World War I’s Trench Rations, which consisted of large amounts of food such as canned bread, corned beef and sardines meant for the entire unit to consume, MREs have grown smaller and more complex, while still retaining the nutrients required to sustain Soldier’s energy. In 2008, Combat Feeding began fielding the “First Strike Ration,” which is a compact assault ration designed to eat on the move. It consists of many of the items found in the MRE, but which can be carried in the cargo pocket and don’t need to be eaten with a spoon. MREs have grown immensely in terms of variety of options and cuisines represented since the Trench Rations of World War I. Kennedy, along with Julie Smith, senior food technologist for the Combat Rations Team, said options will continue to grow. Smith said the goal is to increase Soldiers caloric intake throughout the day in combat operations while eliminating the need to stop and heat up the food. “For example, the next generation of ration entrees may be processed via microwave sterilization, high pressure processing, super critical carbon dioxide preservation, or osmotic dehydration,” Kennedy said. “These novel food processing and preservation methods may enable us to produce a greater variety of highly desired menu items, for example eggs, macaroni and cheese and deli meats that have a near fresh quality and high nutrient value.” last_img read more

first_img Fitzpatrick said: “I’m young but it doesn’t mean anything. Paddy and Michael have helped me big time and you will see the best from me on Saturday night.” Michaela Walsh moved through to face Olympic champion Nicola Adams in the women’s flyweight final. The Belfast 21-year-old came through against tough Indian Pinki Rani, edging the final two rounds with her cleaner, counter-punching style in order to make sure on the scorecards. Walsh said: “Months ago I said my dream was to fight Nicola Adams in the Commonwealth final and when I go to bed tonight I will dream of that gold medal hanging round my neck. “I know if I perform to the best of my ability I can beat her. She is the golden girl and I’m only a baby but in the ring it’s a different story.” Northern Ireland light-welterweight Sean Duffy was outpointed by Junias Jonas and light-heavyweight Sean McGlinchy also lost on points to David Nyika of New Zealand. Welterweight Steven Donnelly looked unlucky to drop a split decision to Mandeep Jangra of India, and middleweight Connor Coyle was beaten by India’s Vijender (crrct) at middleweight. Alannah Audley-Murphy was outpointed by Australia’s Shelley Watts in the women’s lightweight division, leaving Northern Ireland with four finalists and five definite bronze medals. Barnes breezed into his second consecutive light-flyweight final with a unanimous decision win over Uganda’s Fazil Kaggwa. But earlier in the day he watched his friend Michael Conlan scrape through against Welshman Sean McGoldrick on a technical decision after sustaining a bad cut over his right eye from an accidental headbutt. Belfast boxer Paddy Barnes believes the sport’s world governing body will vote to bring back headguards after a Commonwealth Games campaign marred by a series of high-profile cuts. And Northern Ireland lightweight Joe Fitzpatrick also required treatment to a gash beneath his left eye after a straightforward win over Michael Alexander of Trinidad. Conlan in particular now faces a race against time to be fit for Saturday’s bantamweight final against England’s Qais Ashfaq, and Barnes believes a U-turn on the decision is inevitable. Barnes said: “I think headguards will be back. It’s great to see them off because it’s better to watch, but it’s impossible to fight so many times in so few days without headguards on – it’s ridiculous.” Conlan, who also suffered a cut to the top of his head in his first round win over Matthew Martin, is convinced he will be able to compete in the final. “I felt the cut straight away but it was cleaned up well by the doctor and I will be in the ring tomorrow,” Conlan said. “I’ve never been cut on the face or the head in my life until this tournament so it’s a bit unfortunate, but I’ve had it glued and it will be okay. “I was happy with the way I boxed before it was stopped and I am just happy to be in the final. Tomorrow is going to be a golden day.” The 19-year-old Fitzpatrick produced another composed performance to see off Alexander and book a final against Scotland’s Charlie Flynn. Press Associationlast_img read more