first_imgDespite Wednesday’s expected high of 31 degrees, the Siegfried Hall Ramblers will be wearing only T-shirts, shorts and flip flops as part of their annual Day of Man. The event aims to promote solidarity with the homeless — many of whom do not have adequately warm clothing during winter months — and collect funds for the South Bend Center for the Homeless, junior Michael Hernick, Day of Man co-commissioner said.“Last year we raised $22,000, so I mean, our goal for this year is to beat that again,” junior Isaac Althoff, Day of Man co-commissioner, said. “That was $9,000 over our previous record, so [to] just keep pushing the record up there is always the goal.”Siegfried Hall president, sophomore Sam Bishop, participated in the Day of Man last year and said the event is “a lot of fun” despite the cold temperatures.“Probably my best memory is standing outside of South Dining Hall for an hour in the freezing cold, and I was dressed as a banana and we had some funny signs, and just having a lot of fun with the passersby and people laughing at us,” Bishop said. “It hurts because it’s very cold. Your fingers and toes start to hurt, but it’s worth it.” Hernick said when he participated in the Day of Man during his freshman year, the temperature was between 15 to 20 degrees, and it was “snowing sideways.”“I remember I was standing outside [LaFortune Student Center] with one of my friends, and then on the way back, it was really cold out, obviously,” Hernick said. “We decided to sprint back to Siegfried, and then he slipped and dropped his cup, so I had to stand there in the cold helping him pick up all his money. … I felt like my fingers were about to fall off, and I was really mad at the moment, but it’s a good laugh now.”The Day of Man gives Siegfried students the opportunity to bond, Althoff said.“It’s definitely an event that everyone looks forward to,” Althoff said. “People wake up in the morning and they cut their shirts and make them even more scanty. It’s just a big group thing.”Bishop said suffering in the cold helps the men of Siegfried empathize with the homeless and gives them a sense of perspective.“It definitely bonds us because one of the main points of Day of Man — maybe the most valuable thing in it — is an expression of solidarity with the poor, with those who are exposed,” Bishop said. “In expressing that solidarity with them, we are also expressing it with each other. So we suffer together, we stand outside together. We do all of it together for others.”According to Hernick, raising awareness of homelessness is necessary, and a group from Siegfried volunteers at the Center for the Homeless every Saturday.“The goal of the whole day is obviously to raise some money, but it’s also to raise awareness and to work really hard this one day so that people think about homelessness, and think about the problems it poses a little more the other 364 days of the year,” he said.Tags: Center for the Homeless, Day of Man, Siegfried Halllast_img read more

first_imgJudge Grube honored nationally March 15, 2003 Judge Peter Evans Regular News Judge Grube honored nationally Special to the NewsFlorida had a right to be proud when the governor of Nevada proclaimed it “Judge Karl Grube Day” in the state of Nevada.A “Legacy of Quality” became the key phrase as judges and judicial educators from across the country gathered in November in Reno to honor Pinellas County Judge Grube for his 20 years of service as a member of the faculty of the National Judicial College. Since 1983, Judge Grube has taught courses in both civil and criminal law, served as a course coordinator, and provided leadership as chair of the college’s faculty counsel.The NJC was founded in 1963, and is celebrating 40 years of service to the nation’s judiciary this year.Since its inception, the NJC has awarded more than 61,000 professional judicial education certificates. The NJC, located on the historic 255-acre Reno campus of the University of Nevada, is the country’s leading judicial education and training institution.The surprise celebration brought colleagues to honor Judge Grube from across the country. National Judicial College President William Dressel was the first presenter who lauded the judge as a “devoted judicial educator of the highest caliber.”Nevada Supreme Court Chief Justice-elect Deborah Agosti presented Judge Grube with a special order and commendation signed by all the justices of the Nevada Supreme Court, thanking him for his contribution in providing the highest quality judicial education to judges of Nevada and the nation. Justice Agosti also delivered a proclamation from the governor of Nevada declaring a day in celebration of Judge Grube’s accomplishments in the field of judicial education.On behalf of the ABA, Rhode Island District Court Judge Robert Pirraglia also recognized Judge Grube for his service in the annual education programs of the ABA Judicial Division’s National Conference of Specialized Court Judges.From the U.S. Department of Transportation, Brian Chodrow brought greetings from the Outreach Division of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Judge Grube was presented with a distinguished service award for his development and presentation of judicial education programs in the areas of impaired driving and judicial outreach.Palm Beach Judge Peter Evans, representing the Florida Conference of County Court Judges, also presented Judge Grube an award for the “Lifetime Contributions” he made to all the judges of Florida. In recognizing the “legacy of quality” left by Judge Grube, the award quoted Aristotle in stating: “We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.”“It is a privilege and an honor to be selected to teach judges and see some of the knowledge that one imparts actually improving the delivery of justice in our courts,” Judge Grube said in accepting the honors.last_img read more