first_imgThe Saint Mary’s Women’s Choir and the Saint Mary’s Collegiate Choirs will perform their fall concert with Bellacapella on Wednesday in O’Laughlin Auditorium.Conductor Nancy Menk said the Women’s Choir will be singing the same songs they plan to take to the American Choral Directors Association Conference in Chicago this coming February.“One of our pieces, a setting of Psalm 150, is composed by Carolyn Pirtle, assistant director for the Center for Liturgy at Notre Dame, so we have a local composer represented,” Menk said. “Another piece I’m proud of is ‘Heaven Full of Stars’ by Eric William Barnum. It’s a very challenging piece for advanced women’s choirs, and I feel we’re singing it very well.”Sophomore Alyssa Rogers said the challenging music has been exciting to learn.“The music we have been working on is very diverse,” she said. “Some pieces are slow and traditional, but we also have a few that are new and upbeat. Several of the pieces are sung a cappella, and others have very complex piano accompaniment. We are also singing a few pieces in different languages.”Rogers said the concert will showcase the progress and hard work of both choirs.Junior Jackie Schramm said the fall concert is particularly exciting because it is the first time the campus can hear both choirs together. Schramm said she enjoys being in a choir because she can express herself with like-minded people.“Choral music, in my opinion, is a rare opportunity to hear a larger group of people work together to make a uniform sound with just their voices. This skill is not as easy as it seems” Schramm said.Rogers said she has always enjoyed performing arts.“I really enjoy being able to go to choir after all my classes and do something totally different. It’s very relaxing and rewarding for me,” she said. “Most forms of entertainment today are experienced through various forms of media. I think that it is important to appreciate choral music in live performances as well because it is a totally different experience. It’s not always perfect, but it’s real, and that’s what makes it so enjoyable for me.”Menk said participation in choirs has positive effects on students.“There is study after study about how participating in choirs boosts students’ academic abilities and social interactions. It’s a great way to de-stress from homework and exams as well,” Menk said.Tags: bellacappella, chorale, collegiate choir, fall concert, SMC women’s choir, Women’s Choirlast_img read more

first_img Children of a Lesser God tells the story of James Leeds, a new teacher at a school for the deaf, and Sarah Norman, the school’s one-time star student who has stayed behind as its cleaning woman rather than venturing out into the hearing world. James immediately takes a keen interest in Sarah, and tries to persuade her to communicate orally by lip reading as they kindle a romance beyond word. The original Broadway production starred Phyllis Frelich and John Rubinstein, who both won Tonys for their performances. The screen adaptation received five Academy Award nominations and earned Marlee Matlin the 1987 Oscar for Best Actress. The Tony-winning 1980 play Children of a Lesser God is set to return to Broadway for the first time. The new production will be directed by Kenny Leon, who took home the Tony this year for directing A Raisin in the Sun. The Mark Medoff-penned show will open at a theater to be announced in the 2015-16 season. View Commentscenter_img No cast has been set for the revival, although producer Hal Luftig told The New York Times that he and Leon aim to cast a company comprised of various ethnicities. The producer also confirmed that he and Leon did intend to cast a deaf actress as Sarah, noting, “anything else would be insulting to the deaf community.”last_img read more

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The sole source of every Long Islander’s drinking water is being threatened by over-development, pesticides and rising sea levels. But are the policymakers pitching sound planning solutions or something more worthy of being flushed down the toilet?Suffolk County recently released its much-anticipated Comprehensive Water Resources Management Plan, a 1,040-page document that focuses on nitrogen reduction, the most imminent threat to water quality thanks to the hundreds of thousands of homes, businesses and farms that have cesspools instead of sewer connections. What’s just as troubling is that many of these septic systems were built before 1972.Besides calling for the expansion of the county’s sewer infrastructure—one estimate says completely covering Suffolk would cost $9 billion—the plan tellingly calls for ways to “stimulate development in order to promote economic growth and stability.”How very interesting that a proposal to protect Long Island’s crucial water resources mentions the need to promote development.Overall, the new plan is a decent document, but like so many actions taken by the county as of late, it typifies a flawed philosophy that prioritizes economic growth first, and everything else second. Any solid environmental planning effort is based on scientific data, and this latest comprehensive plan is no exception. But its solutions may not be substantive enough. And putting development over water protection will not make environmental actions any stronger.Created in 1987, Suffolk’s first water management plan “provided extensive documentation of the county’s aquifer system, groundwater quantity and groundwater quality.” This plan followed the much acclaimed federally funded Long Island Comprehensive Waste Treatment Management Plan, which was prepared in ’78 pursuant to Section 208 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act. This groundbreaking report, commonly referred to as the “208 study,” highlighted the linkage between land use and groundwater quality.Subsequently, the ’87 “Comp Plan” laid the foundation for future planning efforts that forever changed the physical layout of LI. Without that effort and other plans to implement its recommendations, the 100,000 acres of the Pine Barrens would long ago have been subdivided and developed, neighborhoods would be noticeably denser, and some of Suffolk’s largest parks would cease to exist.But this latest iteration of the comprehensive plan should shift its philosophic focus from mere management to actual water protection, and employ the resources of the county to properly reduce contamination and protect the aquifer.The current plan stresses the importance of reducing nitrogen but it doesn’t emphasize enough the “soft” solutions, such as the most effective water protection tool, preserving open space or designing green buildings and pushing for tougher zoning. Instead, the plan focuses on sewers, and their relative effectiveness in achieving nitrogen reduction. The push for sewers reveals the county’s true intentions: “stimulate development in order to promote economic growth and stability.”In this age, localities too often decide to increase density in Special Groundwater Protection Areas (SGPA), which previous municipal efforts highlighted as too environmentally sensitive for development. Municipalities must be reined in—but this comprehensive plan isn’t hard enough on them to do it. Just recently, it was reported that the Town of Brookhaven’s Planning Board voted unanimously to subdivide a lot in the South Setauket SGPA and allow residential units without sewer connections, while Islip Town wants to place Heartland Town Square, the much discussed mega-development, in the Oak Brush Plains SGPA.The aquifer won’t be slowly poisoned by large actions, but rather by thousands of small ones. This is the reality the comprehensive plan must not only anticipate, but prevent.Many Suffolk residents don’t realize that their neighborhood’s layout was determined not only by what was considered aesthetically pleasing by the builder, but by strict rules that govern density and wastewater flows. In 1980, Article 6 of the Suffolk County Sanitary Code brought the findings of the 208 study to life. The number of units in a development was determined not by a developer’s desires, but rather, the unique limitations imposed by LI’s aquifer system as determined by its hydrogeologic zones, the geographic areas with differing water absorption rates.From that point on, Suffolk enacted a litany of planning efforts geared toward aquifer protection. Article 6 is often the bane of developers’ existence. Thanks to strict limitations of growth in un-sewered areas, which encompasses roughly 74 percent of homes in Suffolk, an area’s ability to grow is essentially defined by its ability to handle wastewater impacts. The latest comprehensive plan doesn’t argue against development, but looks to accommodate it through hard infrastructure improvements.Sewers are needed for environmental reasons, but they pose their own set of problems. According to the U.S. Geologic Survey, areas with sewers on LI have a lower water table thanks to increased water consumption. Inland sewage treatment plants discharge effluent not to the Great South Bay or the Sound, but back into the groundwater. Further, any discussion of expanding our wastewater infrastructure ignores the nearly insurmountable costs of doing so.If Suffolk were to be completely sewered tomorrow, the aquifer would begin to heal itself thanks to the abundance of recharge provided by ample rainfall. By adding sewers to the county while increasing developmental density, we’re only maintaining the status quo—and our water quality will continue its degradation.We need a true effort to protect our precious natural resource, not something to “stimulate development.” We cannot build our way out of our regional woes, especially when it comes to protecting our water and our waterways.Rich Murdocco writes on Long Island’s land use and real estate development issues. He received his Master’s in Public Policy at Stony Brook University, where he studied regional planning under Dr. Lee Koppelman, Long Island’s veteran master planner. Murdocco will be contributing regularly to the Long Island Press. More of his views can be found on www.TheFoggiestIdea.org or follow him on Twitter @TheFoggiestIdea.last_img read more

first_img Loading… UEFA want to use the Super Cup in Budapest next month “as a pilot match for which a reduced number of spectators could be allowed in”.The return of fans to matches amid the coronavirus pandemic was discussed by all 55 UEFA member countries at a video conference, according to the European football governing body.However, UEFA said “it would be too early” to allow fans into the upcoming Nations League matches in September and “that test match(es) should take place to study precisely the impact of spectators on current medical protocols”. UEFA said participants in the video call “underlined the need for strict hygiene and sanitary measures to be in place” to allow fans to return.Some countries have already started to let supporters back to games but UEFA club competitions – both those concluding the 2019-20 and qualifiers for 2020-21 – are currently being played behind closed doors.The issue of quarantines in certain countries was also discussed with UEFA saying associations “were encouraged to approach their governments to seek exemptions”.Read Also: UCL: Bayern must tighten defence against PSG in final, warns Flick“The fact that players will anyway be regularly tested as part of the comprehensive UEFA Return to Play Protocol should ensure that such exemptions do not represent any risk for society.”UEFA said the outcome of the discussions will be presented to their executive committee in the coming days for decisions to be taken. The September 25 Super Cup in the Hngarian capital will take place between the winner of Friday’s Europa League final and Sunday’s Champions League final. Advertisement FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted ContentFantastic-Looking (and Probably Delicious) Bread Art5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksWho Earns More Than Ronaldo?5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksEver Thought Of Sleeping Next To Celebs? This Guy Will Show YouWhat Happens To Your Brain When You Play Too Much Video Games?The Adorable Model For Simba In The Lion King RemakeWhy Go Veg? 7 Reasons To Do This7 Theories About The Death Of Our Universe6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A Drone6 Ridiculous Health Myths That Are Actually TrueWho’s The Best Car Manufacturer Of All Time?last_img read more