first_imgEmma Farnan | The Observer Panelists Fr. Peter McCormick, senior Annie Kuster and junior Daniel Esparza discuss consent and the hook-up culture at Notre Dame.To frame the discussion, the panel began with a short video called “Tea Consent,” which provided a humorous perspective on the topic by using the act of serving someone tea as a metaphor for sexual consent.The panel initiated their conversation by talking about the purpose of dorm parties and the consequences that on-campus parties entail.Esparza said students often uses alcohol and parties as ways to release the stress of a long week, a mindset that can hold potentially damaging ramifications.“It’s very important that people don’t use things like dorm parties and alcohol as a crutch,” Esparza said.Because of the ubiquity of on-campus parties at Notre Dame and the strong connection between residence halls and social life, Kuster said students can sometimes be lulled into a false sense of security when they go to parties in dorms.“We don’t necessarily connect going down the hallway with a place where some problem could be,” Kuster said.McCormick said these thoughts are consistent with his experience as a rector. While Notre Dame has consciously preserved the culture of on-campus parties because it values making residence halls central to student’s lives, he said the prevalence of alcohol on campus does involves some risks.“If we want you to feel that the residence halls are home, you should be allowed to welcome your friends over, and you should be allowed to have parties,” McCormick said. “The mindset of why parties occur in dorms is very much rooted in the community mindset of Notre Dame.”The panel also discussed the differences in social life between men and women in college.Kuster said boys have more power than girls over almost every aspect of a party, from the alcohol they provide to the music they play, because most parties are held in boys’ dorms. Although this may seem like a trivial issue, Kuster said this means girls can feel more helpless in unfamiliar situations.“When you show up to somebody else’s party and boys are the ones throwing the party, they have the control,” Kuster said.However, McCormick said, girls have the ability to decide which parties to go to and can always leave when they feel uncomfortable.“Woman actually have more power and authority than what they think,” McCormick said.The panel then examined the question of why hook-ups and sexual assault seem to be so prevalent in college.Esparza said many students enter college with naive ideas about how sex and relationships actually work, and consequently, can make mistakes without realizing their errors.“Sometimes, especially in college, many people typically don’t see it as rape because they really don’t understand how mutual relationships work,” Esparza said.Additionally, McCormick said the media portrays college far different from reality, with an emphasis on casual sex, drinking and partying. In particular, McCormick said, movies embody this myth and give incoming students major misconceptions about college.“The thing Hollywood doesn’t show you, the thing popular literature doesn’t show you, is how it feels when an unwanted advance gets made on you,” McCormick said.In order to break free from this ignorance, McCormick said students need to be actively involved in both learning about sexual assault and being mindful of their own actions.“We need to be more informed … about the fact that our actions, whether they be subtle, quick or even unintended, have significant impacts on people’s lives,” McCormick said.Tags: Fire Starters, Fr. Pete McCormick, Gender Relations Center, GRC, Men against Sexual violence, sexual assault Dorm parties are a cherished part of student life at Notre Dame, but the abusive drinking and negligence that can often accompany them lead to devastating results, Fr. Peter McCormick, director of campus ministry, said.In an effort to spread awareness about sexual assault and promote conversations about alcohol, consent and dorm parties, the Gender Relations Center (GRC) sponsored a panel discussion Tuesday night at DeBartolo Hall. In addition to McCormick, the panel consisted of senior Annie Kuster, a GRC FIRE Starter, and junior Daniel Esparza, the president of Men Against Sexual Violence. Following the theme of “Let’s Talk about Hooking-up, Consent and Dorm Parties,” they answered questions directly from the moderator and anonymously submitted by the audience.last_img read more

first_imgA new $18.5 million Animal and Dairy Science complex will make the University of Georgia an even better resource for Georgia farmers and consumers. “It’s a stepping stone for UGA to move into the elite,” said Sam Hodge, a senior majoring in meats science, to the crowd of more than 400 who dedicated the facility Feb. 6. Advantages for Georgia Larry Benyshek, animal and dairy science department head with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, said, “We will be able to compete with anyone in the United States with these facilities.” Department Partnerships The new complex includes a large animal research unit. It will allow for intensive research studies in physiology, nutrition and genetics. It also has a meats science and technology center. There, scientists will conduct studies for product quality, consistency and safety. A 150-seat auditorium will eventually be equipped as a distance learning classroom. “The (ADS) department serves a livestock industry with $850 million in cash receipts. . .” ÿ ÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿ Larry Benyshek Center Facts and Figures Faculty Focuscenter_img The UGA department’s quantitative genetics program has gained national attention in beef cattle. The addition of a leading scientist working in the area of cloning has brought in new technology in reproductive biology and adds to the efforts developing mammalian transgenesis. The beef and pork industries have identified product quality and consistency as major research areas. “The new meat science center will provide the facility to carry on a flourishing program in this area,” Benyshek said. UGA ADS Programs Benyshek said his faculty focuses on comprehensive programs dealing with the livestock that have an economic impact on Georgia farmers and consumers. Scientists conduct research leading to new technology and transfer that technology and information statewide through on-campus classes and the adult education programs of the Extension Service. “The department serves a livestock industry with $850 million in cash receipts from beef, dairy, hogs, sheep, horses and aquaculture,” he said. “These farm cash receipts transfer into a multibillion-dollar agribusiness industry.” Karen Holbrook, UGA Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, said the complex offers a unique advantage in economic development on the UGA campus. By allowing for “leading-edge research,” she said, “this facility will serve as an incubator for companies. The community and the academy will now be able to work together within the same walls.” “The department is becoming more and more active in the Georgia Research Alliance effort to promote science leading to economic development,” he said. The fourth floor of the new complex houses four companies in leased space. The companies were founded by faculty members on the UGA campus. “This will become a model for the partnership between science and economic development,” Benyshek said.last_img read more

first_imgDebra Schwartz and Robert Fisher have won at-large seats and Gary Easterling secured the Region I director seat running unopposed on NAFCU’s Board of Directors in voting that closed Monday. All three will be begin their new terms following the close of the NAFCU Annual Business Meeting, set for June 23, 2015 in Montreal.Schwartz, president and CEO of Mission Federal Credit Union (San Diego, Calif.); Fisher, president and CEO of Grow Financial Federal Credit Union (Tampa, Fla.); and Easterling, CEO of United Federal Credit Union (St. Joseph, Mich.); were all elected to three-year terms.“Interest in NAFCU’s board continues to grow each election cycle and we thank all of the candidates for serving their association and our industry,” said Ed Templeton, NAFCU chair and president and CEO of SRP Federal Credit Union. “NAFCU’s continued focus on being the best in advocacy, education and compliance clearly resonates with credit unions.”Also serving on the NAFCU board are:Richard Harris, president and CEO of Caltech Employees Federal Credit Union (La Canada, Calif.) and board vice chairman; continue reading » 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

first_imgImage courtesy of WisonExmar’s barge-based floating storage and regasification unit (FSRU) on Wednesday left the Wison Offshore Marine shipyard in China and set course towards Singapore.In Singapore, the unit will undergo site specific modifications before departing to its project destination to commence its long-term employment mid-2018 in line with its time charter commitments, Belgian company Exmar said in a statement.To remind, Wison delivered the FSRU to the Nicolas Savery-led shipowner in December.Exmar says the unit it is the world’s first barge-based FSRU and is the first of the new generation of floating regasification assets, barge-based, and aimed at catering for the needs of medium-sized LNG import projects.The FSRU features an LNG storage capacity of 25,000 cubic meters and a re-gasification capacity of 600 mmscfd.Exmar added in its latest statement that more information on the FSRU charterer and the location will be released at a later stage.last_img read more