first_imgThe Saint Mary’s Women’s Choir and the Saint Mary’s Collegiate Choirs will perform their fall concert with Bellacapella on Wednesday in O’Laughlin Auditorium.Conductor Nancy Menk said the Women’s Choir will be singing the same songs they plan to take to the American Choral Directors Association Conference in Chicago this coming February.“One of our pieces, a setting of Psalm 150, is composed by Carolyn Pirtle, assistant director for the Center for Liturgy at Notre Dame, so we have a local composer represented,” Menk said. “Another piece I’m proud of is ‘Heaven Full of Stars’ by Eric William Barnum. It’s a very challenging piece for advanced women’s choirs, and I feel we’re singing it very well.”Sophomore Alyssa Rogers said the challenging music has been exciting to learn.“The music we have been working on is very diverse,” she said. “Some pieces are slow and traditional, but we also have a few that are new and upbeat. Several of the pieces are sung a cappella, and others have very complex piano accompaniment. We are also singing a few pieces in different languages.”Rogers said the concert will showcase the progress and hard work of both choirs.Junior Jackie Schramm said the fall concert is particularly exciting because it is the first time the campus can hear both choirs together. Schramm said she enjoys being in a choir because she can express herself with like-minded people.“Choral music, in my opinion, is a rare opportunity to hear a larger group of people work together to make a uniform sound with just their voices. This skill is not as easy as it seems” Schramm said.Rogers said she has always enjoyed performing arts.“I really enjoy being able to go to choir after all my classes and do something totally different. It’s very relaxing and rewarding for me,” she said. “Most forms of entertainment today are experienced through various forms of media. I think that it is important to appreciate choral music in live performances as well because it is a totally different experience. It’s not always perfect, but it’s real, and that’s what makes it so enjoyable for me.”Menk said participation in choirs has positive effects on students.“There is study after study about how participating in choirs boosts students’ academic abilities and social interactions. It’s a great way to de-stress from homework and exams as well,” Menk said.Tags: bellacappella, chorale, collegiate choir, fall concert, SMC women’s choir, Women’s Choirlast_img read more

first_imgJosh Smith began to play around with the idea and got the rest of the engineering team involved. Raymond is manufacturing 2,000 of these face sheild kits, and will donate them to Hospitals in the Binghamton area, Norwich and even select nursing homes. The company has already distributed 1,000 of face shields. Raymond then fired up three of their 3D printers and, using 3D filament, began to print and assemble face shield kits. GREENE (WBNG) — The Raymond Corporation fired up a few of their 3D printers and have started to print face shields for health care workers and nursing home workers. The idea started from an Engineer Josh Smith, his mother, who is a nursing professor at SUNY Morrisville, asked if Raymond could print face shields for her. “We had 3 different printers we could fire up all at once, taking some simple spools of plastic 3D filament and producing these things, the actual mask itself the face shield part is food grade plastic sheeting, it ends up being a pretty simple thing, you can see what it looks like, its nothing complicated,” said Michael Field, the President and CEO of the Raymond Corporation.last_img read more

first_img… hopes COVID-19 doesn’t ruin 2020 Guyana Open CupBy Clifton RossREIGNING Guyana Open Golf champion Avinash Persaud said he’s training 4 times a week in hopes of competitive action returning soon, adding that the time-off was good way to mentally refresh yourself as a professional athlete.Guyana’s most successful golfer told this newspaper on Monday, that he has been maintaining his pedigree by hitting the greens during private practice sessions at the Lusignan Golf Club (LGC) Course a few times every week.Persaud, who has won the country’s top Golf title a record 10 times, with a number of those titles coming consecutively, believes that the little training-time afforded to golfers, who may be working or have other outside commitments; is needed in order to maintain one’s form as a pro-golfer.“I’ve been keeping and putting in as much practice as I can during the week. It’s good to keep training and go out there, get in some strokes just for a couple of hours a day; it’s good for me”, declared the champ.Although golf is playable during the pandemic due to the way golfers can reduce the number of holes as well as take to the greens without a caddy, the COVID-19 risk is still high. Persaud, not looking too much on his time away from golf, noted that he was using quarantine as a way to refresh the mind and body,“I always keep on training and practising because I’m hoping there is a tournament sometime time soon. But as a professional golfer, it is a very important time to take some time off and get your mind off golf and ease some stress,” said Persaud.A few weeks ago, the executives and members of the LGC gave back to their community of Lusignan on the East Coast of Demerara. The drive was part of many around the country and world, which was specifically geared towards helping those affected by the pandemic.Residents of Lusignan received a hamper among other means of relief, compliments of the LGC family, who said they felt the need to take care of the single-parent families and families of caddies who are out of work. The champ hailed the move as one which will only help to fight the pandemic going forward.Persaud also believed that should the current state of things remain a daily way of living for the next few months, the sport and its shareholders could suffer greatly.The champ who went to Jamaica and Suriname last year to represent Guyana at the respective invitational tournaments, believed that the ripple effect could trickle across the boardThe harsh reality is that should the course remain close for a few more months, the financial setback which mainly affects caddies and those employed in different positions at the Club, will inevitably end up hurting everyone affiliated with the sport – sponsors, players and grounds-men and others.“It was a good thing (the relief drive) because it helped the caddies and their families as well as those single parents who are facing a tough time during C0VID-19. We will have a good day when things get better but it can affect us because we need golf to keep the club and ground going; along with our sponsors for our weekly tournaments,” the champ pointed out.Wrapping up his interview, the defending champ was optimistic that the future will be kind to gold and that the LGC can host its annual Guyana Open Cup, which usually takes place between October and November.Persaud was further confident that his training and weekly practice sessions can see him get in some putting roughly 4 times a week, which will be enough to capture his 11th title, once the Guyana Cup is hosted.“Not playing competitive golf is tough but it’s not a worry for me (my playing form) because I’m always training and working on my game. But hopefully we can get in a few tournaments when things get safer, before the Open Cup,” Persaud concluded.last_img read more