first_imgMembers of the women’s boxing program, Baraka Bouts, directed their physical and mental toughness toward raising funds for East African Holy Cross Missions this past weekend in their signature event, the Power 24 Hour. With the hope of raising more funds and increasing awareness of the club and charity, the team changed and intensified the structure of this year’s event, senior captain Jen Coe said. “For a few years now, we’ve had a ‘power-hour’ where the boxers are split into two teams and try to beat each other in the number of pushups, sit-ups and jumping jacks that could be completed in the hours,” she said. “We wanted to double the amount of money raised, so we spread it over an entire day in the hopes of garnering more funds and raising more awareness about our club, the tournament and the Holy Cross missions.” The longer time period allowed the boxers to test their creativity and come up with unique approaches to their workout, senior captain Carleigh Moore said. “At one point we were doing push-ups for every dollar raised,” Moore said. “It was a great way to get in shape for the Bouts all in the name of a great cause.” Coe said there was an advantage to working out in one-hour shifts over the previous structure of one 24-hour period. “Since everyone had a one-hour shift, the energy was kept high as people were rotating in and out, then coming back later to visit and cheer their fellow team-members on,” she said. “We were working out for a good cause, so it wasn’t hard to keep up the spirit.” While the team has not yet totaled the funds raised from the Power 24 Hour, both Coe and Moore said they are extremely grateful for the outpouring of support. “The response was incredible. Students, faculty, alumni and fans were so generous and receptive to our cause,” Moore said. “Thank you to everyone who donated to help us support the efforts of the Holy Cross Missions in Uganda.” The women’s boxing team will fight in the Baraka Bouts tournament in the beginning of November to raise additional funds, which will benefit two secondary schools in Kasese and Jinja, Uganda. The women’s boxing team is changing the structure of the Baraka Bouts tournament this year as well, Moore said. “For the first time, women’s boxing will be holding a two-day tournament,” she said. “Our vision for this year’s season has been double the bouts, double the donations.” This year’s Baraka Bouts event will take place on Monday, Nov. 7, and Thursday, Nov. 10. Tickets for entry on both nights can be pre-purchased from any Baraka Bouts participant for $10 until the night of the tournament.last_img read more

first_img UM honors Judge Hoeveler May 15, 2002 Regular News The University of Miami School of Law’s Center for Ethics and Public Service recently honored U.S. District Judge William M. Hoeveler with its First Annual William M. Hoeveler Award.The award was created to honor those who exemplify ethics and leadership in the legal profession. Judge Hoeveler received the inaugural award named in his honor at a special reception at the Federal Courthouse in downtown Miami.“The Hoeveler Award is being established by the center to honor devotion to ethics and leadership not only in bar and bench, but also in the civic community,” said UM Law Professor Anthony Alfieri, director of the law school’s Center for Ethics and Public Service. Recently honored with the Miami-Dade County Commission for Ethics and Public Trust’s ARETE award, the center also recognizes the contributions of those in the legal profession with its Lawyers in Leadership Award.An adjunct professor at UM’s Law School since 1995, Judge Hoeveler serves on the Advisory Board of the school’s Center for Ethics and Public Service. He was appointed to the federal bench in 1977, and chaired the Standing Committee on Professionalism for The Florida Bar from 1992-94.He was named best district judge in the 11th Circuit by The American Lawyer in 1983, and received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Greater Miami Jewish Federation in 1991.center_img UM honors Judge Hoevelerlast_img read more

first_imgTopics : China revoked the press credentials of three Wall Street Journal reporters, in a rare move punishing multiple journalists at a single news organization over an opinion piece.The government made the decision after it said the Journal refused to apologize for a “racially discriminatory” op-ed, Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang told reporters in Beijing on Wednesday. Foreign journalists need press passes issued by the foreign ministry to qualify for visas to report in the country.The Wall Street Journal reported that the three were Deputy Bureau Chief Josh Chin and reporters Chao Deng and Philip Wen. Chin and Deng are both US nationals, while Wen is an Australian citizen. “The editors used such a racially discriminatory title, triggering indignation and condemnation among the Chinese people and the international community,” Geng told reporters in an online press conference. “China demands the WSJ recognize the severity of its mistake, make an official apology and hold the persons involved accountable.”China expelled a Wall Street Journal reporter last August after the paper published a report detailing allegations that Chinese President Xi Jinping’s cousin was involved in gambling and potential money-laundering in Australia.The US this week designated five Chinese state media companies as “foreign missions,” a decision that reflects the Trump administration’s view that Xi’s Communist Party is imposing increasingly draconian government-control over news services, senior State Department officials said. The designation requires the outlets to adhere to requirements similar to those imposed on embassies and consulates in the USUS puts restrictions on five Chinese state media outlets“China and the US, and a number of Washington’s allies, aren’t just decoupling parts of their economy,” said McGregor, of the Lowy Institute. “With decisions like these, they are entering parallel news and information universes.”China’s foreign ministry denounced the US designation on Wednesday, saying the country’s media outlets helped promote understanding and adding that Beijing would “reserve the right” to retaliate. “We urge the US to discard its ideological prejudice and Cold War zero-sum-game mentality, and stop ill-advised measures that undermine bilateral trust and cooperation,” Geng said.center_img “This marks a new low in relations between China and the foreign press, and says a lot about Beijing’s broader antipathy to the West,” said Richard McGregor, a former Financial Times bureau chief in Beijing who’s now a senior fellow at the Lowy Institute. “Beijing is looking to lash out at its critics. Once it has gotten over the coronavirus crisis, expect to see more such measures.”While China has declined to approve press credentials for foreign journalists before, it’s rare for authorities to punish three reporters at once from the same news organization. It also sets a worrying new precedent for news outlets with staff in China as the article was written by an author based in the US who wrote opinions, which are generally removed from news-gathering operations.The Feb. 3 article described China as the “sick man of Asia,” a phrase often used by 19th century European powers to describe the weakened state of the Qing Empire, which then governed China. A representative for the Wall Street Journal in Beijing didn’t immediately reply to an email requesting comment.The op-ed ran as China began battling the deadly coronavirus, which has now claimed the lives of more than 2,000 people and delivered a massive setback to the world’s second-biggest economy. The government has described the virus as a threat to “social stability” in China and tightened restrictions on online expression.last_img read more