first_imgNEW YORK, AP: The Ring Magazine is making Muhammad Ali its 1966 Fighter of the Year, a half century after refusing to give him the award because of his disapproval of the draft for the Vietnam War and connection with the Nation of Islam. The boxing magazine said it was righting a wrong by retroactively naming the late heavyweight great as the best fighter of 1966. “The editors at that time obviously felt strongly that Ali, while succeeding in the ring, didn’t meet other criteria they deemed important,” said Michael Rosenthal, the magazine’s editor-in-chief. “But we can see the injustice by today’s standards, even if we take issue with some of things Ali said and did.” Impressive wins Ali won all five of his fights in 1966 and did so in impressive fashion. He was at the peak of his career, which was soon to be interrupted for three years while he fought the courts over his refusal to be drafted. Ali would later have his conscientious objector status upheld by the US Supreme Court, and resumed fighting in 1970. He was named the magazine’s Fighter of the Year in 1972, 1974, 1975 and 1978 along with his original award in 1963. Ali died in June at age 74 after years of battling Parkinson’s.last_img read more

first_imgThe women’s wing of the Grand Masonic Temple, the Naomi Chapter # 12 of the Order of Eastern Star (OES), has donated food and other items to the Americans for Africans Incorporated (AAAI) orphanage.Worthy Matron G. Lucinda Worquea, on behalf of the Charity Committee of the Naomi Chapter # 12 of the OES said the donation is part of their annual event to help those desperately in need; especially children and widows.The Worthy Matron quoted her favorite verse of scripture, Proverb 19:17, which says: “Whosoever is generous to the poor lends to the Lord, and He will repay him for his deeds.”“On behalf of the trustees, worthy matrons, worthy patrons, officers and members of Naomi Chapter # 12 of the Order of Eastern Star, this donation is our way to buttress your efforts in taking care of and educating these children. It also serves as the chapter’s ways of identifying with the needy in times like these. We believe that you will benefit from and use these items wisely,” Worthy Matron Worquea said.The presentation of the items took place at the headquarters of the Americans for Africans, Incorporated (AAAI) in Paynesville, outside Monrovia.The donated items include four bags of rice, one large bag of sugar, one tin of powdered milk, one five gallon container of vegetable oil and a bag of salt.Others items donated were one large tin of mackerel, a carton of bathing soap, two (2) cartons of powdered soap, two sacks of tissues and one box of toothpaste.The chairman of the Charity Committee of the Naomi Chapter # 12 of the Order of Eastern Star, Associate Matron Beatrice J. Thompson, said it gives the officers of the chapter great joy to take part in charity programs that help them reach out to the needy.“During this time of year, Naomi chapter # 12 identifies with the needy and less fortunate. We are here to do our best for the children in the hopes that God will continue to bless you for the work you are doing for them. We pray that these kids will eventually become the country’s future leaders,” Associate Matron Thompson said.Past Matron and Co-chairman for the Charity Committee of Naomi Chapter # 12 of the Order of Eastern Star, Sis. Aretha Collins expressed her thanks to officers of the Charity Committee for accepting her proposal after assessing the AAAI orphanage. She explained the reasons she identified the orphanage was due to its appalling condition and appealed to the AAAI proprietress and president Oretha Wesee for the Naomi Chapter #12 to come to its aid.“During my assessment at the home I saw the kids and the little food they were eating, so I spoke with the proprietress and she told me they were in need of food and improved sanitation,” Past Matron Collins said.Continuation of the OES’s donation to needy institutions as part their charity program will resume next month, according Chairman Thompson.For her part, orphanage proprietress, Madam Oretha J. Wesee, said she was grateful to God for the donation and indicated that this is the second time for the sorority of women to identify with her home.She urged humanitarian groups and individuals to come to the aid of her orphanage as its school is in desperate need of food, pampers, soap, toiletries and other items to reopen for the sake of the children.According to Madam Wesee, the AAAI was founded in 2001 and has helped 98 kids get adopted to homes in the US and other part of the world.  These adoptions ceased in 2009 since a moratorium was placed by President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more