first_imgNow is the peak time to plant peanuts in Georgia, according to Cristiane Pilon, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension peanut physiologist.During a research trial on the UGA Tifton campus in 2017, Pilon planted peanuts at three different times: mid-April, mid-May and early June. She discovered that the seedling vigor in the peanuts planted in May was the strongest.“By choosing these dates, we were able to see how the soil temperature affected the early-season physiology of the most-planted cultivars, such as Georgia-06G,” said Pilon, who plans to conduct the research trial again this year and in 2019.Seed vigor is the ability of the cultivar to rapidly develop its first true leaves and root system under suboptimal environmental conditions.According to Pilon, soil temperature is the pivotal factor in deciding when to plant peanuts.If peanuts are planted too early, the seedling emergence and vigor tend to be lower due to cooler temperatures in April, which may impair yields. If peanuts are planted too late, growers may see early seedling emergence due to higher temperatures in early to-mid June, but lower yields have been observed.“The temperature must be higher than 68 degrees Fahrenheit over a three-day period,” Pilon said. “To start germination, peanut seeds need good soil temperatures, water and oxygen. If there are no potentially adverse weather conditions, then farmers are good to plant.“You have to make sure your plants are healthy and vigorous throughout the process for a successful production. The faster the plant grows, the more vigorous it is,” she said.Pilon wants to understand the relationship between time to emergence and other physiological processes for peanuts. She hopes her research will help farmers make more precise planting decisions.“I read research on other row crops, and the development of first leaves is so important because that’s when the plant becomes photosynthetically active, greatly contributing to growth,” Pilon said. “We conduct research to identify the underlying physiological mechanisms promoting seedling vigor in order to help farmers make viable planting decisions. By planting in May, or when the weather conditions are just right, they will have a better product.”For more information regarding peanut research, visit www.caes.uga.edu/extension-outreach/commodities/peanuts.html.Julie Jernigan is an intern at UGA-Tifton.last_img read more

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Halfway through his routine at NYCB Theatre at Westbury last Friday, British-born political satirist John Oliver whipped out his smart phone and searched “Long Island Big Duck.”The search result prompted him to instantly fall to his knee and become consumed by laughter.Oliver apparently makes it his mission to uncover strange facts about each American town he visits. For example, seeing a sign for a library in Boise, Idaho, prompted him to wonder why it’s punctuated with an exclamation point—he learned it was paid for by a charitable donation. Here he wondered out loud why any region would need a giant duck. Long Island’s response: why not?The famed Big Duck wasn’t the only weird fact that Oliver uncovered: a more extensive search noted another popular, err, destination.“What’s the Commack Motor Inn?” Oliver asked the crowd, which erupted in the kind of laughter you get when nearly everyone is on the joke except for the naïve few.“Hourly rates!” yelled a man in the audience. Oliver let that one sink in for a few seconds.He appeared to take as much joy from the back-and-forth with the appreciative crowd as those who paid to see the popular comedian in a very different format than they’re used to.Oliver just completed the first season of his new HBO show “Last Week Tonight,” which ended with rave reviews. In that provocative program, Oliver sits behind a desk and does the news, though he does not accept the title of journalist. For years, he worked as a “correspondent” on Jon Stewart’s “The Daily Show,” and then took over for Stewart while he was away producing his film “Rosewater.” Oliver’s unofficial late-night audition impressed HBO bosses, who later offered him his own show on Sunday evenings, considered prime-time real estate on the subscription-based network.On “Last Week Tonight,” Oliver predominantly focuses on politics, sometimes for the laughs and other times to raise awareness, like when he discussed how the US government fails to welcome into this country Afghan interpreters who were crucial to the military’s effort against the Taliban in Afghanistan. Sometimes the comedian spurs people into action. Take, for example, when he encouraged the masses to deluge the Federal Communications Commission with letters supporting Net Neutrality. The day after the show aired, the FCC Tweeted that its comment system was experiencing “technical difficulties” due to “heavy traffic.”Since cable consumers have to pay a separate charge to watch HBO, the network’s shows are not judged by TV ratings so it’s hard to analyze how well their exclusive productions are performing. But Oliver’s success can be judged by the Internet’s reaction to his show in the days and weeks after it airs: His segments spawn dozens, if not hundreds, of articles from news organizations and his YouTube clips can hit upwards of 7 million views for a single video.In short time, he has become just as effective, or even more so, than Stewart, his mentor, and fellow satirist Stephen Colbert, whose Comedy Central show will come to an end this week.Oliver rarely holds back during “Last Week Tonight,” often discussing topics that irk him—America’s drone war, police militarization, student loan debt—and feverishly pounds away at them. But he was less audacious during his stand-up routine in Westbury, briefly mentioning recent news events like last week’s Senate torture report. He gave his two cents and then moved on.Oliver seemed content with discussing rather more innocuous topics: how a pigeon wandering around Newark Liberty National Airport reinvigorated seemingly lifeless travelers, how a “Frozen Dead Guy Day” in Colorado came to be, and recalling a letter to the editor that a local Boise newspaper received from a reader aghast at his bewilderment over the unusual “Library!” sign.Taken together, this was Oliver’s portrait of America: a spectacularly diverse country with idiosyncratic communities that we understand but regrettably take for granted. Oliver, however, seems to prefer the US to his home country, which he admonishes for pillaging other lands in its failed quest for world domination. To be fair, he has problems with US policy as well, but he finds America’s peculiarities—the Big Duck, for example—unbelievably charming.The strategy seemed to sit well with the nearly sold out crowd. He drew huge laughs when he discovered the history of the Big Duck and took jabs at LI for its omnipresent traffic. When he asked the crowd for examples about what made Westbury unique, he was amused when a woman muttered: “There’s no Eastbury.” When he admitted to his youthful futility on the soccer field, the crowd seemed to let out a giggle all at once, prompting Oliver to shout: “Fuck you, Long Island!”Some Oliver fans may have been eager to hear him dissect politics and touch upon a range of issues affecting the country. But Oliver does that on Sunday nights.The Englishman often mentioned how much he adores this country and how grateful he is for the opportunities he’s been afforded since coming here. His retelling of his experience across America was his way of giving back.Thank you, John, for reminding us all just how wonderfully weird this place we call home truly is.last_img read more

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The sole source of every Long Islander’s drinking water is being threatened by over-development, pesticides and rising sea levels. But are the policymakers pitching sound planning solutions or something more worthy of being flushed down the toilet?Suffolk County recently released its much-anticipated Comprehensive Water Resources Management Plan, a 1,040-page document that focuses on nitrogen reduction, the most imminent threat to water quality thanks to the hundreds of thousands of homes, businesses and farms that have cesspools instead of sewer connections. What’s just as troubling is that many of these septic systems were built before 1972.Besides calling for the expansion of the county’s sewer infrastructure—one estimate says completely covering Suffolk would cost $9 billion—the plan tellingly calls for ways to “stimulate development in order to promote economic growth and stability.”How very interesting that a proposal to protect Long Island’s crucial water resources mentions the need to promote development.Overall, the new plan is a decent document, but like so many actions taken by the county as of late, it typifies a flawed philosophy that prioritizes economic growth first, and everything else second. Any solid environmental planning effort is based on scientific data, and this latest comprehensive plan is no exception. But its solutions may not be substantive enough. And putting development over water protection will not make environmental actions any stronger.Created in 1987, Suffolk’s first water management plan “provided extensive documentation of the county’s aquifer system, groundwater quantity and groundwater quality.” This plan followed the much acclaimed federally funded Long Island Comprehensive Waste Treatment Management Plan, which was prepared in ’78 pursuant to Section 208 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act. This groundbreaking report, commonly referred to as the “208 study,” highlighted the linkage between land use and groundwater quality.Subsequently, the ’87 “Comp Plan” laid the foundation for future planning efforts that forever changed the physical layout of LI. Without that effort and other plans to implement its recommendations, the 100,000 acres of the Pine Barrens would long ago have been subdivided and developed, neighborhoods would be noticeably denser, and some of Suffolk’s largest parks would cease to exist.But this latest iteration of the comprehensive plan should shift its philosophic focus from mere management to actual water protection, and employ the resources of the county to properly reduce contamination and protect the aquifer.The current plan stresses the importance of reducing nitrogen but it doesn’t emphasize enough the “soft” solutions, such as the most effective water protection tool, preserving open space or designing green buildings and pushing for tougher zoning. Instead, the plan focuses on sewers, and their relative effectiveness in achieving nitrogen reduction. The push for sewers reveals the county’s true intentions: “stimulate development in order to promote economic growth and stability.”In this age, localities too often decide to increase density in Special Groundwater Protection Areas (SGPA), which previous municipal efforts highlighted as too environmentally sensitive for development. Municipalities must be reined in—but this comprehensive plan isn’t hard enough on them to do it. Just recently, it was reported that the Town of Brookhaven’s Planning Board voted unanimously to subdivide a lot in the South Setauket SGPA and allow residential units without sewer connections, while Islip Town wants to place Heartland Town Square, the much discussed mega-development, in the Oak Brush Plains SGPA.The aquifer won’t be slowly poisoned by large actions, but rather by thousands of small ones. This is the reality the comprehensive plan must not only anticipate, but prevent.Many Suffolk residents don’t realize that their neighborhood’s layout was determined not only by what was considered aesthetically pleasing by the builder, but by strict rules that govern density and wastewater flows. In 1980, Article 6 of the Suffolk County Sanitary Code brought the findings of the 208 study to life. The number of units in a development was determined not by a developer’s desires, but rather, the unique limitations imposed by LI’s aquifer system as determined by its hydrogeologic zones, the geographic areas with differing water absorption rates.From that point on, Suffolk enacted a litany of planning efforts geared toward aquifer protection. Article 6 is often the bane of developers’ existence. Thanks to strict limitations of growth in un-sewered areas, which encompasses roughly 74 percent of homes in Suffolk, an area’s ability to grow is essentially defined by its ability to handle wastewater impacts. The latest comprehensive plan doesn’t argue against development, but looks to accommodate it through hard infrastructure improvements.Sewers are needed for environmental reasons, but they pose their own set of problems. According to the U.S. Geologic Survey, areas with sewers on LI have a lower water table thanks to increased water consumption. Inland sewage treatment plants discharge effluent not to the Great South Bay or the Sound, but back into the groundwater. Further, any discussion of expanding our wastewater infrastructure ignores the nearly insurmountable costs of doing so.If Suffolk were to be completely sewered tomorrow, the aquifer would begin to heal itself thanks to the abundance of recharge provided by ample rainfall. By adding sewers to the county while increasing developmental density, we’re only maintaining the status quo—and our water quality will continue its degradation.We need a true effort to protect our precious natural resource, not something to “stimulate development.” We cannot build our way out of our regional woes, especially when it comes to protecting our water and our waterways.Rich Murdocco writes on Long Island’s land use and real estate development issues. He received his Master’s in Public Policy at Stony Brook University, where he studied regional planning under Dr. Lee Koppelman, Long Island’s veteran master planner. Murdocco will be contributing regularly to the Long Island Press. More of his views can be found on www.TheFoggiestIdea.org or follow him on Twitter @TheFoggiestIdea.last_img read more

first_imgHe says that misinformation has turned more conspiracy ridden since 2016 and says that people need to be cautious of posts they may see online, adding to always check a story across multiple news sites in order to verify its legitimacy. (WBNG) — One of the outcomes of the 2016 elections showed that misinformation was prevalent on social media, but Jeremy Blackburn, Assistant Prof. of Computer Science at Binghamton University, warns it’s still very much around in the 2020 cycle. Blackburn says that while more social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter are more aware of misinformation and they do try to ban it, it is still readily accessible on other smaller sites, like Reddit, and users are still being exposed to it.last_img read more

first_imgTopics : “I hoped that if I came in contact with the infection, I would also get some extra money,” said Maria, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, fearing she could damage her career prospects.What happened was quite different.After a patient she visited and swabbed tested positive, Maria was ordered to self-isolate for two weeks. When she got her April salary, it was cut to just 14,000 rubles.Her salary varies from month to month, but the most she makes is 36,000 rubles, working two different jobs and overtime, she said. “I could have contracted the virus, but instead of a bonus, my salary is less than usual,” said Maria, who was only given one surgical mask and a pair of gloves per shift.Healthcare workers across Russia watched Putin promise doctors extra pay and monthly bonuses of between 25,000 and 80,000 rubles to medics and drivers working to fight coronavirus.But when overworked doctors opened their April pay slips, most saw no sign of these generous sums. A ‘cruel joke’ That feeling has compounded frustration in the medical community that they are taken for granted, especially after a recent cycle of “optimization” reforms that closed thousands of clinics.”This looks like a cruel joke to medical workers” already used to unfulfilled promises, says a petition launched last week by the Action union, which is demanding full payouts.The appeal, which calls on the government to widen eligibility for extra payments, has been signed by more than 90,000 people.Konoval said the Kremlin’s vow to pay doctors extra created tension between medics and society at a time when most Russians are struggling economically.”This rumor that doctors get paid a lot of money during the pandemic is unpleasant for doctors who continue to work for a pittance,” he said.Most in the field are unwilling to demand extra pay in a country where the medical profession is regarded as a service, rather than work that should be compensated appropriately.”Patients are telling us that we must be getting a lot of money for working so much,” Maria, the doctor outside Moscow, said. “But nobody complains because it makes no difference,” she said. “I want justice to prevail, but I’m not going to start a war.”center_img Maria, a 24-year-old doctor working outside Moscow, expected to be paid extra if one of her patients tested positive for the coronavirus. Instead, her salary shrank.In a small town 200 kilometers from the capital, she visits patients at home and normally has around three calls a day. But that number surged to 30 in April as the pandemic struck Russia.When President Vladimir Putin promised on TV in April that doctors would get a monthly bonus of 80,000 rubles ($1,100) for treating virus patients, she thought it was compensation for increased risk and workload. ‘Huge disappointment’Many posted photos online of paychecks where the extra money amounted to $10 dollars or less — or nothing at all.On Wednesday, Prime Minister Mikhail Mishustin acknowledged the problem.The government has transferred 27 billion rubles for healthcare bonuses, but regional authorities have only paid out 4.5 billion, he said.”There are problems with payments even in regions most hit by the infection, where the workload on medics is at the maximum,” he admitted.With more than 242,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases and cases steadily rising, Russia has the world’s second-highest number of infections.Andrei Konoval, head of the Action union of medical workers, said Putin’s directive lost its punch as it percolated through the healthcare system’s bureaucracy.Some hospitals only added certain staff to “coronavirus teams”, so when others, like Maria, faced the virus they were not eligible for the bonus.In some regions, facilities calculated time in contact with the infection down to the minute to save money.Ambulance crews at some hospitals would only get paid extra for treating confirmed coronavirus cases. “In reality, ambulance teams going out on a call about high blood pressure risk infection even more,” because they have less protection and patients do not know if they are infected, Konoval said.Putin’s bonus promise had sounded “very attractive”, he said, “but it has resulted in huge disappointment among doctors.”last_img read more

first_img26 Murlong Crescent, Palm Beach.The highset, dual-living home is on a 556sq m block in a tightly-held pocket which overlooks Tallebudgera estuary to Burleigh Heads.“There is a development approval to build two luxury, four-bedroom homes,” Mr Holland said. The property was snapped up for $55,000 when it first hit the market in 1975.Last year, Palm Beach was the Gold Coast’s fastest-selling suburb with some properties spending less than two days on the market before being snapped up. CoreLogic data revealed the Gold Coast was the busiest non-capital-city auction region last weekend, with 70 auctions held and a clearance rate of 53.9 per cent. The results were in front of Geelong, the Sunshine Coast and Hunter regions. 150 Mallawa Drive, Palm Beach.A space-age design and sparkling purple splashback are just some of the features of this four-bedroom home, with McGrath marketing agent Andy Hogarth recording strong interest from Melbourne buyers.“There is always the occasional Sydney buyer, but I have seen a surge in people from Melbourne who have taken a keen interest in Palm Beach,” Mr Hogarth said.McGrath agents Tony Holland and Rachel Ford also expect to see a strong crowd for their auction of a 1970s home at 26 Murlong Cres on Saturday at 1pm. 240 Mallawa Drive, Palm Beach.McGrath Palm Beach agent Maria Hobbs has organised the ice cream cart to beat the heat at her 2pm auction of 240 Mallawa Drive on Saturday.“It is going to be a hot one so I have got the gelato cart in to keep the kids busy and the bidders cool,” she said. Mrs Hobbs said there had been plenty of interest in the property, with 40 groups of interstate and local buyers inspecting the house since it went on the market.More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North10 hours ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa1 day ago“The interstate buyers have huge interest in Palm Beach,” she said. “They really want a family home closer to water.”Mr Keeley will then move up the street at 3pm to auction 150 Mallawa Drive.center_img 240 Mallawa Drive, Palm Beach.CROWDS of interstate buyers are expected to descend on Palm Beach this weekend with the auction activity so hot one agent has organised an ice cream cart for the crowd.Three Palm Beach waterfront homes are among a total of 21 properties lined up for Gold Coast auctions this weekend.Auctioneer Richard Keeley, who will call two auctions at Mallawa Drive, described the suburb as a “sleepy town” which had risen to fame in the past six months.“Palm Beach has become very hot in a short amount of time – and that is because the market has realised it has value for money,” he said. “With new infrastructure and a boom in hip cafes, the area is really on the radar for interstate buyers. There is strong capital growth in the area and it will continue.“There are always five to 15 registered bidders every Saturday in the area.” last_img read more

first_imgDidier Houssin (right), Chair of the Emergency Committee, speaks next to Director-General of the World Health Organization Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus during a news conference after a meeting of the Emergency Committee on the novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) in Geneva, Switzerland on Jan. 30. REUTERS/DENIS BALIBOUSE GENEVA – TheWorld Health Organization (WHO) declared on Thursday the coronavirus epidemicin China now constitutes a public health emergency of international concern. “Our greatestconcern is the potential for the virus to spread to countries with weakerhealth systems,” Tedros said.   Tedros AdhanomGhebreyesus, WHO director-general, announced the decision after a meeting ofits Emergency Committee, an independent panel of experts, amid mountingevidence of the virus spreading to around 18 countries. The WHO panel,chaired by Didier Houssin of France, is composed of 16 independent experts.(Reuters)last_img read more

first_img “We are delighted to welcome Aaron back to Everton,” manager Roberto Martinez told evertonfc.com. “We know we are getting a player our fans know inside-out. “He had a major role in the second half of our season and we’re looking forward to Aaron kicking on and continuing to enjoy his football, as well as being the productive player we know he can be. “He is well-respected in the dressing room, his experience in the Premier League is immense and he will immediately add to our squad and to the ambition we have as a club.” Despite Lennon’s arrival, Everton’s transfer business has left fans distinctly underwhelmed. The arrival earlier in the day of River Plate defender Ramiro Funes Mori filled one of the slots Martinez was targeting, although the fee of £9.5million was £4m more than was touted last week when the 24-year-old Argentinian came to England to finalise the move. However, the Everton manager’s search for a player who could operate in the number 10 role proved fruitless and appears to have left the squad light in terms of options. But Mori’s acquisition at least eases one problem for Martinez, having allowed Sylvain Distin and Antolin Alcaraz to leave at the end of last season. The 28-year-old returns to Goodison Park on a permanent deal after spending the second half of last season on loan. Despite manager Roberto Martinez’s interest in the winger, the move was finalised after the deadline after Everton filed a deal sheet with the Premier League just before 6pm announcing their intention to sign the player, giving them a further two hours to complete the formalities. Everton have completed the signing of Tottenham winger Aaron Lennon on a three-year contract. Press Association “When I heard about Everton’s interest, I didn’t think twice. My agent told me about this opportunity and Everton did everything to bring me over and I wanted to come,” the player, who was at Everton’s home match with Manchester City just over a week ago, told evertontv. “I feel happy because the people here have shown me a lot of love and I’m very happy and comfortable here already. “I saw the people at Goodison Park and I saw they were a family and all cheering the players and obviously I liked that atmosphere. “Hopefully I can fit straight into the group, we can get along and do big things here.” Mori provides Martinez with some much-needed cover for John Stones and Jagielka at centre-back, with youngster Brendan Galloway, currently sidelined with a knee injury which has forced him to withdraw from the England Under-21s squad, offering a fourth option. “I’m delighted for many reasons. Firstly, the player we are welcoming into the dressing room fits the profile we need,” Martinez told evertontv. “He is a left-footed centre-half – a really good defender who is exceptional in the air with good quality. He will give us great balance in the back-four. “Then you have got the personality and character of a winner . He has just won the Copa Libertadores with River Plate, which is the equivalent of the Champions League in South America. “You don’t get that sort of player, at the age of 24 who has just been called up for Argentina, becoming available. “We have made a massive effort and it is a fee that reflects the value and the ambition that we have as a football club to attract such an exciting player for the future.” Everton’s business has been minimal this summer, with young defender Mason Holgate acquired from Barnsley for about £1m and 22-year-old Uruguayan striker Leandro Rodriguez joining from River Plate Montevideo. His biggest challenge was fending off sustained interest from Chelsea and a transfer request from Stones. A third bid in excess of £30m was turned down and chairman Bill Kenwright made a strong public statement insisting the young England international was not for sale, and the club have, at least, managed to hold on to one of their prized assets. Away from transfers, left-back Bryan Oviedo has withdrawn from the Costa Rica squad for friendlies against Brazil and Uruguay because of a knee injury. The 25-year-old will remain on Merseyside for treatment rather than join up with his international team-mates and is expected to be out for around 10 days. last_img read more

first_imgELLSWORTH — Ellsworth High School boys’ basketball coach Peter Austin, left, was recognized at Monday night’s City Council meeting for recently being named the Big East Coach of the Year. Council Chairman Bob Crosthwaite presented Austin with a certificate and thanked him for his leadership during the past season. The Eagles won the Northern Maine Class B regional title and made it to the state title game, where they fell to Lake Region. Crosthwaite said the team’s championship run created a wonderful spirit of camaraderie in the Ellsworth community.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textlast_img read more

first_imgA small group of Syracuse players looked at one another, deciding who would be the spokesman for the latest historic event in a long line of them for the Syracuse men’s lacrosse program.The Orange had just captured the 800th victory in program history, a feat only duplicated by Johns Hopkins — a school that currently sits at 896 wins. Finally, the oldest at the podium took the microphone. SU’s crew of juniors at the table — Jovan Miller, Josh Amidon and Stephen Keogh — deferred to senior Max Bartig.‘Eight-hundred wins for any team is a huge feat,’ Bartig said. ‘That can go toward Coach Desko, toward the players, toward the coaches in the past. It’s just a number. Like Jovan (Miller) was saying, it’s all about the team for us.’Most of the players said they weren’t aware of the impending mark before the game. For SU head coach John Desko, though, it was a different story.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textDesko has been with the Orange as a player, assistant coach and head coach for more than 405 of the team’s 800 wins. And he took time after the game to revel in the accomplishment of his program.‘To be part of that tradition as an assistant coach and as a head coach, and to see it all, it’s important,’ Desko said. ‘ … To have this consistency and to be part of so many national championships and final fours and other championship games, I just feel I have a great appreciation of where it is and where it’s been. To be part of it is very important to me.’Faceoffs from the other sideSyracuse’s faceoff specialists haven’t been kind to their opponents so far this season. Jeremy Thompson and Gavin Jenkinson have each used different techniques to get the Orange possession and win the faceoff battle consistently. Thompson and Jenkinson have dominated in the X and have been most of the reason SU has gained possession on 59.1 percent of the draws so far this season. On Saturday, Albany’s Matt Mackenzie welcomed the challenge. He didn’t win the faceoff battle, but he had the most faceoff wins of any individual the Orange has faced so far this season. After the game, Mackenzie said the key to his success on the day started with his positive mindset going into each faceoff.‘I needed to go in there regardless of who I’m facing, whether it was Thompson or it was (Jenkinson),’ Mackenzie said. ‘You just need to go in there and have that mindset of, ‘You know what, I’m going to get this ball.’ I felt that I did a good job.’Before Saturday, the most faceoff wins an individual opponent had against came from Virginia’s Ryan Benincasa on March 7, when he had 10 wins on the draw in SU’s only loss of the season. And Mackenzie knew he would have to have similar success to give the Great Danes a chance. ‘Jeremy Thompson has like, five or six goals in under six seconds (this season),’ Mackenzie said. ‘I went into the game thinking I had to cut down on the fast break. I can’t let that happen, and I thought I did a pretty good job of tying them up.’Learning from last year  When Albany came to the Dome last season, Syracuse seemed to have a stranglehold on the game by halftime. The Orange took a 10-2 lead over the Great Danes into the break. But in the third, Albany came roaring back. The Great Danes outscored SU 8-1 in that quarter to pull within one goal.  Although the Orange did pull out the 15-13 win a year ago, head coach John Desko made sure his players did not forget about that game when they took a 9-3 lead into the break Saturday.  ‘In between the periods it was all about talking about what could happen and making sure that we valued our possessions and that we stayed out of the penalty box and didn’t make mental errors,’ Desko said.  Albany did score the first goal in the third quarter, but Bartig and senior attack Chris Daniello quickly abolished the Great Danes’ comeback hopes.  Just 12 seconds into a man-up opportunity, Daniello hit Bartig on the left side of the goal, and he fired a shot perfectly into the top corner of the cage. Two minutes later, Daniello breezed by Albany defenseman Brendan Gleason on a restart and scored from just outside the crease to extend the Orange lead to 11-4.  Albany head coach Scott Marr said his team had an opportunity to go on a run with the performance of faceoff man Matt Mackenzie. But unlike last year, it never materialized.  ‘We pieced a couple (goals) in there again, but they sprinkled some in so we never really could close the gap,’ Marr said. ‘In years past, we’ve gone on five-, six-, seven-goal runs, and unfortunately today, we didn’t have that same run.’ bplogiur@syr.edu zjbrown@syr.edu Published on April 5, 2010 at 12:00 pm Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Commentslast_img read more